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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Lovely unidentified image of Signorina Lina Cavalieri. In her time, she was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. (Confidentially, we're inclined to agree, but would never say so out loud, as our other postcards are always listening...:)

    Orphaned at 15, Signorina Cavalieri ran away from the convent orphanage where she was placed by the state, and through great effort, talent and tenacity, became one of the most wealthy and successful opera singers of la Belle Epoque, performing internationally in all the great opera houses of Europe and the Americas.

    Below, follow our link to youtube where you can hear la Belle Cavalieri sing!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuMfcj02jCk&list=PL2B15325067277A20

    Fantastic jewelry! A very nice card. Photo by Reutlinger, published by NPG. Minor wear to edges and corners.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    9.00 USD

    This is an interesting one for a couple of reasons. First, it is one of two cards we are listing in "The Kiss," that rather than produced in France, were produced in Germany. Germany was certainly the picture postcard hub of the entire world prior to the First World War, and the majority of high quality cards were printed there and exported to other countries during that golden age of the postcard. But it's also interesting because the sender, having written long messages in a careful, tiny, script, dated the messages, 1919, just one year after the war ended.

    Well, when the war began, in 1914, Germany was no longer exporting cards to France (their enemy in that terrible conflict), but we can see that the card is titled "Le Baiser," French for, "The Kiss." So clearly this card was produced in Germany, for export to France, dating this card to sometime between 1910 and 1914, rather than 1919, as the sender's date would suggest. Of course you probably notice the dramatic differences in style that a decade, or so makes between this German card from around 1912, and the other cards (from the 20s) in this section.

    A word on "Baiser." Naturally, we thought about naming this section, "Le Baiser." What could be better, right? Maybe not :) Though un baiser was simply a kiss in those bygone days, it often means (colloquially) something a little more intimate today. Let's just say that if you're visiting friends in France and offer one of them a big "baiser," you might either get a polite chuckle, or considerably more than you bargained for :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    9.00 USD

    This is an interesting one for a couple of reasons. First, it is one of two cards we are listing in "The Kiss," that rather than produced in France, were produced in Germany. Germany was certainly the picture postcard hub of the entire world prior to the First World War, and the majority of high quality cards were printed there and exported to other countries during that golden age of the postcard. But it's also interesting because the sender, having written long messages in a careful, tiny, script, dated the messages, 1919, just one year after the war ended.

    Well, when the war began, in 1914, Germany was no longer exporting cards to France (their enemy in that terrible conflict), but we can see that the card is titled "Le Baiser," French for, "The Kiss." So clearly this card was produced in Germany, for export to France, dating this card to sometime between 1910 and 1914, rather than 1919, as the sender's date would suggest. Of course you probably notice the dramatic differences in style that a decade, or so makes between this German card from around 1912, and the other cards (from the 20s) in this section.

    A word on "Baiser." Naturally, we thought about naming this section, "Le Baiser." What could be better, right? Maybe not :) Though un baiser was simply a kiss in those bygone days, it often means (colloquially) something a little more intimate today. Let's just say that if you're visiting friends in France and offer one of them a big "baiser," you might either get a polite chuckle, or considerably more than you bargained for :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    7.00 USD

    So Cute!!! Wonderful Art Deco elements. This is not a postcard. It is a photograph that measures approx. 6 and 1/4, by 4 and 3/4, inches. Please note that this very charming piece of depression era American pie has been through the mill! It was roughly removed from one of those old fashioned black paper photo albums (taking a lot of the paper backing with it in the process), was cut down on the bottom edge, possibly for framing, and there were a few little pieces of tape affixed to the right edge that we carefully removed without doing any more damage, but it is just a bit sticky there, so you get the idea. Priced accordingly.

    Follow the link below to hear and see a clip of the master, Teddy Brown, (probably a hero to these two sisters :) performing a xylophone medley in 1931.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8uyEe3nKfo

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two items, we will refund the postage on the second item, and when you purchase three or more items from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Though posted in 1905, this card was probably produced no later than 1904, and likely closer to 1900. The theatrical production it represents, can't be confused with the Ballet d'Orphée set to the Stravinski score, since that one wouldn't exist for another 50 years, or so. Probably this depicts a scene out of the late 18th century opera Orphée et Eurydice, by Gluck, for which a French libretto was rewritten, from the Italian, in the 1770s. Slightly different versions of that opera, with lots of ballet routines, were still very popular in 1900.

    Anthony's of Paris was a photographic studio in business from, at least, the 1890s, into the early 1930s. We can say that much for certain, having located cabinet cards, cartes de visites, and later postcards, that were produced over that time. The photographer (presumably Monsieur "Anthony") never gained the kind of notoriety enjoyed by Leopold Reutlinger, Henri Manuel, or the other major French photographers whose work we often list in our shop, and perhaps this is why we can find no biographical data on him, whatsoever.

    Today, the images most often recognized as his, are probably of the Sisters Lorisson, those five young ladies with the tall chignons, who appeared in dramatic tableau images, in "costumes greques," and often hand-tinted. The images are a little over the top, and the "Sisters," like these young women, were usually posed a little woodenly. Please don't mistake us, though. While admittedly "stagey," and perhaps naive when compared to say, Manuel's work, we find these "Anthony's" images extremely charming, and very evocative of the era. In fact, some readers who have visited our blog, may have noticed that our background image is from a wonderful Sisters Lorisson card.

    This Anthony's image is lots of fun, really kind of magical, we think, and in wonderful condition! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We have a theory about these cards, okay, I have a theory...it has to do with their essential nature, and goes beyond their material component parts, the paper, metallic salts, inks and paint.

    You know what you sometimes get a sense of at the train station, or the airport, when you witness a homecoming? The embrace of lovers, or of parents and children, and it is a kind of electric field coming off of them. On a chilly night, you could almost warm your hands by it. I suspect this is what is most real and permanent about human beings, but it is certainly a subtle thing, and not something we are often aware of as we rush about the ordinary business of the day.

    Well, I believe that is what we love most about these cards. Of course their subject matter has a lot to do with it. In renaissance times, many of the great painters composed masterpieces in which they arranged their subjects on the canvas in a mathematically precise way so as to reflect a number they believed to be sympathetic with a particular planetary influence. The pigments they used were also carefully chosen and balanced in this way so that a painting, in its final form, was for example, also a talisman of the sun, and would be presented as such to their patron.

    Of course, in the early days of industry, during which our postcards were produced, it is doubtful that such intention was ever applied, so that it was by happenstance only that such affects were achieved, but here... have you often seen an image that better describes joy than this one?

    And one in a group of thirty or forty women, in a small room off a narrow and crowded lane in Paris's Quartier Latin probably applied the color to this image. They were, perhaps, paid in piecework, so their efforts were hurried. No great thought would have gone into their choice of coloration, so almost by accident, then...what beauty was achieved!

    And finally, before the ease of communication afforded by the invention of the telephone, all of the love and kindness poured into these cards...it is remarkable, and the pleasure gotten when they arrived in the post.

    In this case, Mlle. Marie received this card from her friend Mlle. Maud, who writes thanking her for the card she received earlier, which, she says, was very lovely, and made her happy. She asks for a long letter, and requests that she be remembered to Marie's Mother and Father.
    Marie, we imagine, received this card with happiness and surprise, and had perhaps brought it to the breakfast table, where she absentmindedly set down a bowl of strawberries that was a little wet on the bottom, and left a mark that decades later resulted in the oxidized crescent we see in the image today.

    When Marie carefully stored this card in her album (so many young ladies kept a postcard album in those days), it was preserved with all its constituent parts intact, among them, I like to imagine, the love and affection inherent in both its sending and receiving that, like rays of the sun entering a room through a glass window are held within that room, were caught inside this card, and stored there,
    so that more than a hundred years later, this is what we hold in our hands, a card possessed of love, happiness, beauty, joy and warmth retained for more than a century. The photographer, the colorist, the young actress in the swing, Marie, and Maud, all are probably dust by now, but all of them are here. In a very pure sense, magic :)

    A wonderful card, unidentified artiste, and no photographer attribution. Very nice posted condition but with a crescent stain on the image that seems to add to, rather than detract, from the magic of the image. How does this happen?

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    This is very possibly a rare postcard image of the famous American Belle Epoque dancer Loïe Fuller (January 15, 1862-January 2, 1928). It is really difficult to be absolutely certain. If you are interested in this image, we recommend that you Google image search Loie Fuller and do further comparison there.
    If you wind up finding an image of a statuesque beauty, well, it probably isn't Miss Fuller you are looking at.

    Below, is a link to a brief clip of an early film which has been purported to be of Miss Fuller dancing her famous Serpentine dance.

    Full disclosure here, though: we have also read that Miss Fuller was never actually filmed while dancing...however, the gal in this clip certainly does resemble a number of images of "La Loie."

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NnHfNHu5GsM/UYlgDfdOMKI/AAAAAAAAM_I/FDjvtZfR3GA/s1600/tumblr_lx5oe45Lai1r8wxeyo1_r3_500.gif

    She was a remarkable woman whose name became, in many ways, synonymous with Art Nouveau and la Belle Époque. Only one of the ways in which this is remarkable is the fact that Loïe Fuller (born Marie Louise Fuller) was a somewhat short, chubby girl from Illinois, not known for being a great beauty (though we don't find her to be in the least bit unattractive), who after gaining a middling reputation as an actress and singer in the States, and rapidly approaching middle age, made her way to Paris, opened at the Folies Bergeres, and became an almost instant success. Although she did return, now and then, to the U.S., and maintained her citizenship here, she basically adopted France as her home, and France, most certainly, adopted her.
    The postcard image itself, though it might seem bizarrely psychedelic for the era, and is certainly hand-tinted, is probably quite close to the way some of her dance performances would have looked in actual fact. Predating the psychedelic discos of the 60s by, well, at least 60, or so years, Miss Fuller danced upon a glass floor, beneath which were arranged electric lights which shone through colored gels, flashing on and off and alternating in color, creating a similar effect. Of course the brilliance of the colors in this card is enhanced by the radium treated photographic paper upon which it was printed.

    Loïe Fuller also founded a number of dance schools in the United States and Europe for students interested in following the path of this iconic dancer. Called her "muses," or "Fullerettes" Miss Fuller is said to have doted on her students (one of whom was, for a short time, Isadora Duncan), and in the choreography and production end of performances with these girls, her work was almost as highly regarded as was she herself for her own interpretive dance routines.

    A pioneer of modern dance, Loïe Fuller was also the developer of the "serpentine," or "skirt" dance. Part of the magic of this style, which involved the manipulation of sometimes hundreds of yards of silk, creating flowing patterns around and above the dancer, was the effect of colored lights shone up through a glass floor upon which the dancer performed. Miss Fuller was one of the earliest developers of colored gels for theatrical lighting, as well as a number of chemical formulas for use in lighting effects. Though not born into high society, or highly educated, she counted among her closest friends, top ranking scientists and inventors, members of European royalty, and artists of all mediums.

    The information we offer here, is a short version of what we offer in a post on our blog about Miss Fuller and family, which has many images, and even a link to a short silent film on Youtube which can give you a good idea of what this style of dance really looked like in action. Link to that blog post below:

    http://redpoulaine.blogspot.com/2013_07_01_archive.html

    A really wonderful and unusual card.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    59.00 USD

    Beautiful card! La Gourmandise, by Raphael Kirchner.

    We haven't gained access to any detailed bibliography of Kirchner's cards, but from what we have gathered, this card was produced in 1914, at just about the time Kirchner moved from Paris to the USA where he would spend the last three years of his life. Les Péchés Capitaux, is French for what we call the 7 deadly sins, la Gourmandise, being Gluttony. Pierrot seems mildly critical...and of a single egg! :) Very minor wear to corners, otherwise in extraordinary condition!
    Please examine our high res scans carefully for detail.

    For more on Kirchner, please read the wonderful summary below, that we found on the website ArtHistory.net. We usually write our own listings, but this is great. Informative, concise, and we certainly couldn't have done it better!



    "Introduction to the Artist Raphael Kirchner
    By ArtHistory.net



    Vienna-born artist Raphael Kirchner was born in 1876. Influenced by Aubrey Beardsley’s Art Nouveau style, Kirchner has often been compared to the artist Alphonse Mucha who also primarily painted women. But while Mucha went on to focus on poster art, Kirchner designed postcards during what has been dubbed “The Golden Age of Postcards.” Women in Kirchner designs were usually garbed scantily (though elegantly) and shown sitting at their vanities or lounging on beds. Some are simply smelling flowers or playing an instrument like a harp.

    Not much is known about Kirchner’s private life. While in Vienna, he painted portraits for wealthy Viennese clients. He later moved to Paris (around 1900) where he illustrated for the magazine La Vie Parisienne. This popular French magazine famously featured other well-known artists like Georges Barbier and Georges Leonnec. The magazine became infamous for its risqué, yet tasteful illustrations of women. Kirchner’s illustrations for the magazine led to his career designing more than one thousand illustrated postcards featuring mostly women.

    Most of Kirchner’s women are based on his wife Nina who modeled for him. Many of Kirchner’s designs demonstrated a strong Japanese influence as best evidenced by his Geisha series of illustrations. While in Paris Kirchner continued to do portrait work and illustrate for other magazines. Kirchner’s illustrations of Paris life became very popular—especially as he portrayed its sensual side in bars and fashionable bedrooms. His depictions of women, while erotic, are also exquisitely lovely. Like Mucha, Kirchner portrayed women as essentially beautiful—sometimes ethereally so.

    Kirchner moved to the United States around 1914. His postcards became particularly sought after during WWI by soldiers on both sides of the war. Art historians credit Kirchner’s postcards as revealing the first pin up girls. Soldiers collected Kirchner’s postcard beauties and hung them in the trenches. Kirchner’s war postcards were less draughtsmanlike than his earlier designs and also more directly sensual. These erotic postcards were soldiers’ favorites and their popularity during these war years influenced the work of later pin up artists. While in New York, Kirchner also worked as a theatre costume designer as well as a portrait artist.

    Kirchner died in 1917. His wife and main model Nina attempted suicide after his death. Subsequent accounts of her life suggest she went mad with excessive drug use. Kirchner portrayed his wife so often that it would be impossible to ignore their artist and muse-like relationship. His portrayals of Nina suggest enchantment, beauty, and certainly love. Kirchner’s postcards are among the most highly collectable. His rarest designs are extremely valuable and continue to fetch large sums at auction."

    Here is a link to ArtHistory.net:

    http://www.arthistory.net/artists/raphaelkirchner/raphaelkirchner1.html

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!

    Kirchner,raphael kirchner,risque,nude,WWI,art nouveau,vintage postcard,1910s,pin up


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    We're particularly fond of Mauro Camuzzi (1893-1964) images. He seemed to love creating a soft-focus, almost surreal (and sometimes very surreal), atmosphere.

    Wonderful card published by Fotocelere, an Italian company out of Torino (Turin) that, according to the Metro Postcard publisher list, was in business from 1910 until 1942.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    We're particularly fond of Mauro Camuzzi (1893-1964) images. He seemed to love creating a soft-focus, almost surreal (and sometimes very surreal), atmosphere.

    Wonderful card published by Fotocelere, an Italian company out of Torino (Turin) that, according to the Metro Postcard publisher list, was in business from 1910 until 1942.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    We're particularly fond of Mauro Camuzzi (1893-1964) images. He seemed to love creating a soft-focus, almost surreal (and sometimes very surreal), atmosphere.

    Wonderful card published by Fotocelere, an Italian company out of Torino (Turin) that, according to the Metro Postcard publisher list, was in business from 1910 until 1942.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    This is probably our very favorite Dolores Del Rio image! Though we rarely see her made up with those wonderful "racoon" eyes (common for a few different reasons on film stars of the previous decades) she shows herself here, to be every bit as "fatale" as Miss Theda Bara, and was never mired in that character type, limiting her options, as type-casting did in Theda Bara's case.

    Though at the time this Ross Verlag card was published (1929/30), Dolores Del Rio was a huge star of silent films in Hollywood, and just beginning to stretch into the "talkie" roles, to call her a silent film star leaves out all the rest. This actress, dancer, muse, had a truly magnificent career. She easily made the change from the silents to the talkies, she did radio, television, she was a star in Hollywood, in Europe (winning at Cannes), and was probably the biggest star of Latin America during the first half of the 20th century. She took Orson Welles as her lover, supported the losing side in the Spanish Civil War, and so (for both of those reasons), wound up in hot water with the HUAC boys. She was close friends with Marlene Dietrich, Charlie Chaplin, and Evita Peron, and...well...we could go on and on, but do check out the Wikipedia article. She led a fascinating life.

    A magnificent card, in fine, unposted condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    This small carte de visite sized photograph appears to have been taken during the late 1800s, or perhaps as late as the early 1900s. The Cuirassiers were the last of the European "knights in armor," and as late as WWI, (1914-18), rode on horseback, as mounted cavalry in their breastplates, into pitched battles against the modern weaponry of the early 20th century. So for the military history buff, here we have a rare photograph of a young Cuirassier in Cuirass and displaying his sabre. The photograph is in very nice condition. It appears to have been coated in the studio, both front and back, by a kind of flexible laquer, perhaps to waterproof it? and there are not so much cracks, as tiny horizontal wrinkles, (maybe we could call them laugh lines?), in the laquer's surface on the face of the photograph that are much more apparent in our scan than in person. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and beginning today, when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free!

    And please come visit our brand new blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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    22.00 USD

    "Pigeon vole!
    Aérogyne Elle ment avec son corps
    Mieux que l'esprit n'imagine
    Les mensonges
    du decor."

    Jean Cocteau

    Miss Aérogyne, La Femme Volante, or "the Flying Woman"

    From her costume, and stage name, you might think Miss Aérogyne was a trapese artist, or even a human cannonball, and at some point in her career, who knows? She may have done those things as well.

    But for this act, she was a stage magician, an illusionist, and making use of careful set design, and no doubt some daring acrobatics as well, she would appear to be flying through the air, much to the delight of the audience, one of whom, writer and film director Jean Cocteau, composed a poem about her in the early 1920s.

    "Fly pigeon," he writes, and though we won't attempt a poetic translation here, he seems essentially to say that with her body, and with the lie supported by the stage decor, she creates the illusion of flight, better than he can imagine in his own mind.

    Apparently he was so enchanted with the produced special effect, that he reproduced it in 1924, in his film "Roméo and Juliette." This, according to a scholarly article by Professor Jennifer Forrest, follow link to read more.

    http://newprairiepress.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1544&context=sttcl

    Full disclosure: Professor Forrest gives the name of Miss Aérogyne as Marie Fourrier, but also writes that she cannot be certain the "Miss Aérogyne" whose performance Monsieur Cocteau so enjoyed, was necessarily the same one. Apparently she had many imitators.

    A very nice circus/vaudeville card. Like many cards of this genre, it was a cheaply produced souvenir, a photolithograph, not a photograph, but captures the era and the feel of the circus ring beautifully :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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    49.00 USD

    We are rather excited about this one! Posted in 1912, in the neighborhood of two years before her first film role, we believe this to be an early unidentified image of Theda Bara, the Queen of all Hollywood Vamps.
    Though several years younger in this, than in most of the images we can find of her, and tinted in pink and lavender, when we are so used to seeing her garbed in stark, gothic, black, her features are nevertheless unmistakable, and even in 1912, she had mastered the classic "I will devour you" look that brought her such undying fame.
    By 1912, Miss Bara had long since left her home town of Cincinatti, moved to New York, and four years previously had made her Broadway debut in "The Devil." Also in New York, were the well known Broadway showgirl photographers Jacob Schloss and J.B. Falk. In addition to sometimes dressing up their actress models in wreaths of Spring blossoms (a la Professor Stebbing), there were direct connections between Falk, Schloss, and German postcard printers and publishers, as for example Arthur Schwarz of N.P.G., and although an actress would, even on European postcard versions, often be identified, along with the well known "Schloss NY," or J.B. Falk identifying signatures, a common practice at the time was to take the earlier identified images, and hand-tint or otherwise decorate them, at which point attributions were left off, either because the actress was well known enough that identification was unnecessary, or so it might be offered to a broader market of standard "glamor" shot buyers. We are confident that this is what occurred in this case, and are presently doing our best to locate the original image.
    Postcard images of Theda Bara are almost impossible to find on the open market these days, and a rare early pre-movie star image is well...almost priceless. But still lacking appropriate proof, we've set a price.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    ***We're putting up a few black and white images of Miss Bara that we've pulled off the web, for comparison's sake. Please keep in mind that these photos would have been taken several years after the one in our possession. These are not our images, and of course, are not for sale.***

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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    7.00 USD

    Very dramatic photo lithograph of a young woman with a very Isadora Duncan profile. Charles Collas' company produced many, many, lithograph print postcards. Like many printers in Cognac, they began by producing the labels for countless bottles of...you guessed it...cognac! :) and then, when postcards became a serious business, they incorporated the production of them into their business scheme.

    Nick in upper right corner.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Cute Belle Epoque image by Professor Edward Stebbing, circa 1905 of artiste De Trévise in a gorgeous gown. Sharing the stage is a marvelous wicker chair!

    We have no history on Mlle. De Trévise. Trévise is the French "Treviso," a town in northern Italy, and given that many performers chose stage names corresponding to their places of origin, she might have been an Italian performer, but that is just a shot in the dark. Also, almost certainly unrelated but still of interest to us is that before they changed its name in 1872, the famous night spot, the Folies Bergere, was called the Folies Trévise!

    A very nice card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Marcelle Lender was dancing professionally by 16, and within a few years her flame-red hair was setting Paris, and then all of Europe, ablaze. She was immortalized by the famous French post impressionist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec in a number of his works. We've included an image of one as a thumbnail in our listing images just for fun.

    A wonderful portrait of a talented performer who in some ways expressed the heart of the era. Very nice condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    9.00 USD

    Precious! "Jeune Kabyle," or Young Kabyle, image of a pretty little girl in traditional dress. The Kabyle are a North African Tribal people who in years past were often referred to as "Berbers," because of the Afro-Asiatic Berber language that is still one of their their common languages today.

    Many of the Kabyle fought long and hard against the French colonization of Algeria beginning in the 1850s, and later, for Algerian independence from France.

    Photographs of the Kabyle people were very popular with postcard collectors in France, especially because of French colonial interests in North Africa. The influence of the music, dance, and the traditional costumes and jewelry of the Kabyle is very evident on many postcards depicting theatrical performers during la Belle Epoque. Many western European performers, like Cleo de Merode and Mata Hari, entertained audiences in the Parisian music halls and theaters with costumes and routines adapted from folk traditions around the world. This illustrates how colonialism not only benefited western nations politically and economically, but was a huge contributor to the cultural melange of those nations.

    A lovely card in very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Nathalie Lissenko, was born in Russia in the 1890s, appearred in films in pre-revolutionary Russia, and expatriated to France immediately following the revolution in Russia, and continued to make a number of successful silent films in France. She did not make the transition to talkies, and pretty much faded into obscurity like so many of the great silent stars.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free!

    And please come visit our brand new blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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