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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Lovely young woman with lyre, in this Belle Epoque image utilizing the classic Grecian motif, which was very much in vogue at the time. Blank backed card, in very nice condition, probably published sometime between 1895 and 1905, Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and beginning today, when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free!

    And please come visit our brand new blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    12.00 USD

    Great Pierrot image, ravishingly red, by Fotocelere in Paris.

    By the time the 1920s rolled into view, a little of the gilding had rubbed off the picture postcard's "golden age." Some of the major players in the industry had changed; patterns in employment, looming economic depression, the toppling of monarchs and technological advances, all contributed to a slump in postcard collecting worldwide.

    Whether skilled colorists found better paying work elsewhere, or the struggling industry hired fewer of them (and spent far less on paints and dyes in an effort to cut costs), postcards decorated by means of pochoir (the French stenciling technique that required less time and skill from colorists), and monochrome tinted images like this one became much more common. The bright, sometimes garish (don't we love them :) colors caught the eye of the consumer, and they were cheaper to produce. Still, these monochrome tints remain some of our very favorite cards.

    Quite a lot of writing on the reverse side, and some minor wear to edges and corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Pierrot et Pierrette, Tea for Two, Monochrome Couples Romance, circa 1920sThe rosy glow of romance :) Lovely Pierrot image published by Fotocelere in Paris. This company's home was in Turin, Italy, but apparently like many of the larger postcard publishers and printers, they established satellites in other countries, in this case, France.

    By the time the 1920s rolled into view, a little of the gilding had rubbed off the picture postcard's "golden age." Some of the major players in the industry had changed; patterns in employment, looming economic depression, the toppling of monarchs and technological advances, all contributed to a slump in postcard collecting worldwide.

    Whether skilled colorists found better paying work elsewhere, or the struggling industry hired fewer of them (and spent far less on paints and dyes in an effort to cut costs), postcards decorated by means of pochoir (the French stenciling technique that required less time and skill from colorists), and monochrome tinted images like this one became much more common. The bright, sometimes garish (don't we love them :) colors caught the eye of the consumer, and they were cheaper to produce. Still, these monochrome tints remain some of our very favorite cards.

    A very nice card. Writing on the reverse side and minor wear to edges and corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!

    Monochrome tint,1920s,pierrot and pierrette,postcard,vintage postcard,romance,theater,pink,rose


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Great hand-tinted seasonal montage of a Leopold Reutlinger portrait of stage performer Elise De Vere superimposed onto a holly branch in a wintry night sky. Not certain how many images there were in this series, but we have two of Miss De Vere that we'll be showing off today, and we've run across a number of images of other artistes on holly branches and also on sprigs of mistletoe. Lots of fun :)
    Elise De Vere was not French. She was an Englishwoman, born Constance, one of several children of Herbert Shakespeare Gardiner Williams (aka Charles De Vere), a stage magician, and Julia Ferret (aka Okita) also a stage magician. They traveled and lived all over Europe, and at one point owned a magic shop in Paris, not far from the Folies Bergeres. The family was deeply entrenched within the Entertainment community, and so it's no wonder Elise took to the stage.
    Of related interest is that although Elise herself didn't seem to take to stage magic, her younger sister Clementine, in between training wild animals in the circus, and marrying a Russian prince and going into hiding from the Bolsheviks, became Ionia the Enchantress, a stage magician who is almost legendary in "magic" circles.
    A very nice card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    ***Warning*** Very geeky deltiology stuff to follow (even the word "deltiology," a term coined in the 1940s for postcard collecting, is kinda geeky, no? :).

    Postcard collecting is the world's third most popular hobby! But interest in postcards today, compared to what it was at the time this lovely card was printed, has paled considerably. In the early 1910s, the postcard industry was absolutely huge. To give you an idea of it, in the United States alone, in 1908, when our population was only about 89 million, over 677 million postcards were mailed! That doesn't even cover those that were purchased that year, but not mailed!

    This card was produced by the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, one of the biggest European publishers at that time. The image itself, though lovely, is a relatively ordinary one for the period. Head and shoulder shots of pretty women were ubiquitous. But the collection of postcards, as popular as it was, also generated other pastimes, one of which was the decoration of them.

    The hand-decoration of postcards at home was common enough as a hobby that kits containing paints for coloring them, ground glass glitter in different colors, glues, etc., were sold in shops for that very purpose. Tiny human hair wigs were commercially produced to be overlaid onto these "glamor" cards. In the 1920s, those "wigs" were often beautifully mar-celled, to keep up with the "flapper" fashion. The end results were amazing, though from the perspective of our sons, the effect is uncanny enough to be labeled "creepy." Can you imagine??? :) But our card, probably produced sometime between 1910 and 1914, was decorated by the careful application of embroidered ribbon, lace, a little glitter, a couple of sequins, and what appears to be brush bristles, giving the model a very elegant appearance indeed. Even our sons approve (what a huge relief!).

    A wonderful find! The back of the card was a bit warped and discolored by the glue affixing the decorations. This is common with cards decorated in this way, and isn't evident on the front side.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail. ***Please Note*** This antique card is almost certainly between 99 and 105 years old. The glue used to attach the decorations would be the same age, so is possibly brittle, and though we've examined the card carefully and have assured ourselves that the decorations are still firmly attached, it would be a good idea, when displaying it, to keep it in its transparent sheath at all times, or better yet, framed under glass! We will ship this card with extra support to prevent bending during shipment.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we occasionally post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more.


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wonderful postcard printed by Monsieur G. Piprot, of "Etoile" Paris. Piprot (himself a photographer as well as being a publisher) often worked with this card's photographer, Professor Edward (sometimes Edouard) Stebbing of Paris. We believe Professor Stebbing was an expatriate Englishman living and working in Paris. He was the special correspondant in France for the British Journal of Photography for a number of years, and was also (as were many photographers at that time) an inventor of some note, producing what was arguably the first "roll film" camera.

    A review of this camera appeared in the British Journal of Photography. If you're interested, just follow the link below to a Google extract:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=4J4OAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA572&lpg=PA572&dq=stebbing+camera&source=bl&ots=-6PQsHcSeQ&sig=XnZowOJJ_CayjEvrUknO_c72LzI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjXqLLdvf_JAhVW9GMKHWV1BbIQ6AEIGTAB#v=onepage&q=stebbing%20camera&f=false

    We also have a picture of the camera you can see, offered by the George Eastman House online, as one of our listing images.

    Although countless numbers of Stebbing's postcard images seem to have been of the more common "flower girl" variety in which pretty young women clasp bouquets of blossoms to their hearts (we suspect this was, due to its popularity, real "bread and butter" work at that time), he also produced a wide variety of work, and in terms of theatrical portraiture, he may be best known for his many photographs of the famous artiste Mlle. Carmen De Villers.

    The particular brilliance and clarity of color in this image is almost certainly due to Monsieur Piprot's "Emaillographie" method of printing. We can't find any specific info on this method unfortunately, but the recipe certainly allowed for an amping up of color and a fine glossy finish beyond much that was typical of the time. Though dated by the sender 1917, we believe this series of cards was printed nearly a decade earlier.

    Nice posted condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Oh my! This proves our theory that pinstripes and pearls go beautifully together! Great image. This card goes just a bit beyond the point, we think, where if we were watching the old movie, the scene would fade to black, and the next scene would open the following morning, with them pouring coffee in the breakfast nook and batting eyelashes at one another :)

    Instead of measuring 5 and 1/2 by 3 and 1/2 inches, as do most cards out of this time, this one measures 5 and 3/8 by3 and 3/8 inches, so just a tad smaller. From evident silvering and minor wear to corners, this appears to have been simply the way this card (probably this "run" of cards) was originally produced, but just for the sake of knowing, there you have it :) Very nice condition.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    26.00 USD

    We call this an "unusual" family photo because my great aunt Marishka and her brother, my great uncle Fedor, have only on rare occasion posed for an out of doors photograph in natural light.

    Although a full solar eclipse does occur every 18 months or so, remember that they are only truly visible from certain vantage points, and so from the perspective of someone living in say, San Francisco, they are much rarer than that.

    Auntie Marishka never likes being photographed, even indoors at night. See how, with her left hand, she made the sign to ward off the evil eye? How cute is that :)

    Posing with them were their two retainers, Evgeny and Boris.
    I actually met them once, but by then they were both hulking, hollow eyed old men with steel-gray hair worn long about their shoulders. That was in the 1950s when I was very small. That was long before I knew the whole family history, and at that time my great aunt and uncle were introduced to me as my "cousins."

    Of course many years have passed since then. A couple of years ago they invited me out for a visit. They were living in Pittsburg at the time, and hadn't changed a bit. They had new retainers by then. Two young Jamaican women, martial arts experts and 5 star vegetarian chefs!

    You should understand that even though my great aunt and uncle come from a very old family, rich in tradition, they treat their retainers with kindness, almost like family, even though Auntie will sometimes flash an evil grin, and with a giggle refer to them as "our henchmen."

    Enough about my eccentric family, though. A very nice, unposted card, and like most RPPCs, a very rare card, being possibly the only copy of this wonderful image still in existence!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    When, on a Tuesday in August of the previous year, Monsieur Hercule Poirot was visiting friends in the charming town of Bargemon (that little jewel of Provence), his host, the venerable Comte de Segur suffered a mild bellyache following the midday meal.

    Poirot recognized at once that the source of his friend's difficulty lay in the veal consommé, which, having been served with the first course, and just prior to the jellied pheasant, was, according to the little Belgian's finely tuned palate, un peu "off."

    Gathering the kitchen staff in the back garden, the famous detective leveled his unshakable gaze at the chef, by whose countenance and carriage, Poirot deduced, had formerly been employed as a wiper in the engine room of a tramp steamer out of Marseille, but that was another story.

    "I believe it is you, Chef René, who is behind my friend's discomfort," Poirot feinted in a sibilant tone that belied the steel flexing just beneath the calm surface of his words.

    "Mais non! But you are mistaken," the chef replied indignantly. "For it was not I who spoiled the broth, but these other fellows," he declared, waving his hand in the direction of his very guilty looking assistants. "There are too many of them, you see."

    By the way, just in case you were wondering, Chef René is the surly looking fellow with the mustache :)

    A wonderful RPPC, circa 1910, of a hotel's, or perhaps a grand chateau's kitchen staff. The photograph was, in fact, taken in Bargemon, in the township of Callas, Provence.

    Are French chefs really surly? Well, speaking from personal experience, and having labored under a couple of them in my youth, the answer is, absolutely :) But then to be entirely fair, France has no monopoly on surly chefs. Regardless of nationality, it is a trade secret, you see. The more the chef scolds their assistant, the better the food tastes!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    A superb RPPC. So many wonderful expressions on their faces. So many bottles! And that crusty bread, mmm. It is very seldom that we come across a hand colored RPPC. Great detail.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    "A Parisian Model," was a very well liked Broadway musical produced by Florence Ziegfeld (of Ziegfeld's Follies fame) in 1906/07. You will notice that, on our card, it is referred to as "Anna Held's." Very good reason for this. She was the star of the show in every respect, and the public never did quite warm up to Flo Ziegfeld ( by all accounts, an inveterate con man, liar, four flusher, and all around no-goodnik :) as they did to his common-law wife, Miss Held.

    On the other hand, if Mr. Show-business hitched his wagon to Anna Held's star (it was she, apparently, who gave him the idea of the "Follies" in the first place), it must be acknowledged that she hitched her wagon to his, that their stars rose side by side, and that they were a theatrical powerhouse of a couple who achieved fame together, even if history treats her more kindly.

    As to the show, "A Parisian Model," The public loved it! Well, most of them, at any rate. Author Ethan Mordden, in his book "Ziegfeld: The Man Who Invented Show Business," quotes one member of the audience, a Reverend Madison J. Peter, as having said, "It's the most immoral spectacle ever put on a stage!" According to Mordden, it was one particular number, in which Anna Held danced the maxixe with Gertrude Hoffman, "making contortions and advances to her partner" that "aroused" (our quotes :) this minister's sense of moral outrage.

    We can find very little history on the lovely actress pictured on our card. Miss Dorothy Bertrand undoubtedly gave a "stand-out" performance as a member of the ensemble cast, or she would probably not have rated her own postcard, and we find mention of her as a member of the chorus in other productions too, but nothing beyond that. How about that costume, though! And dimples!!! :)

    Most of our research here at Red Poulaine takes us to Belle Epoque France, and we so love learning about that place and time, but being Americans, it is a particular treat when we get to follow one of our favorite stars, Mlle. Held, back across the Atlantic, and read reviews of her very popular show here in the states!

    A very nice card, in very nice condition, with just the right amount of silvering on its surface to cast a magical aura over its relative antiquity :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Great "Mysterious East" image! Mia May's long career was mostly on the stage in Germany, though many of the films she made in later years were incredibly popular. She is often referred to as Germany's first movie star, and wonderful images of her in all sorts of fantastic get-ups abound. She worked with Film greats like Hans Conried and Fritz Lang into the mid-twenties. In 1933, with the writing very much on the wall, she and her husband left Germany for America, and Hollywood, as did so many German Film industry personalities.

    This is a very nice, unposted card. The image is probably from one of her many "adventure" films of the mid to late1910s.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Surely Oncle Paul Bernot was the hero of the hour! When Mariette, Jean, Lucie and Peter wandered by mistake into the Enchanted Forest, they were taken prisoner by a band of renegade Brownies.

    Oncle Paul, who remembered the forest paths well (thanks to his adventures there as a boy), did not hesitate, but drove his shiny new automobile as deeply into the forest as its tangled greenery would allow.

    Then, having won the friendship of two very rare and beautiful Viringian dragonflies (that notoriously shy, yet loyal and courageous species), he and these new comrades took wing, flying directly into the midst of the enemy encampment.

    The Brownies, who had never seen an automobile before, were understandably disconcerted, giving Oncle Paul and his new friends the advantage of surprise.

    Making use of a magic wand lent to him by none other than Her Gracious Majesty Morgaine, Queen of all Fairyland and the Outer Regions, Oncle Paul made short work of the mischievous Brownies, and liberated our young friends. Hurrah Oncle Paul! Hurrah! Hurrah!

    Wonderful French RPPC (Real Photo Postcard) of a beautiful parade float, circa 1910s/20s, presumably constructed in a time and place before bureaucratic licensing practices muddied up the fun. So magical, and in very nice condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    This is one of our favorite, favorites! We found this card in the collection of a Bulgarian dealer we know. Gorgeous! She looks a little like Hanni Weisse, but it might well be an RPPC. Love the heavy cake makeup, the beauty mark, and teased up hair! High 20s style, no?
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    A very unusual image of actress Suzanne Miéris, playing the part of the Greek slave, Eunice, in Émile Moreau's Quo Vadis, probably at the Théâtre Antoine, Porte-Saint-Martin, in Paris.

    Quo Vadis, a play based upon a tremendously successful novel by Polish author Henryk Sienkiewicz, was a great hit, and Mlle. Miéris toured with the production as far away from Paris as Brazil. It seems likely that this role catapulted her into stardom, as most of the images we find of her, show her wearing this costume.

    "Quo Vadis," the novel, was also a huge bestseller here in the USA, by the way. Like "Ben Hur," and written at around the same time, it was one of those sprawling romances of popular Christian literature, and probably rivaled "Ben Hur" in popularity for a time.

    We wrote that "probably" her name was Suzanne, because we've found several references to her in which she is called Yvonne. We haven't yet found any definite information offering us a first name, nor any biographical information whatsoever.. All of our references, thus far, have been from snippets in recent articles, blog posts, and other card dealer's listings. However, since we found many more Suzannes than Yvonnes, we're betting on the former (This is a constant challenge one faces in online research. With the best of intentions, "John" says her name is Yvonne. "Mary" repeats it. "Peter" does the same, and suddenly we all take it for fact! Unfortunately, as time passes, documentary evidence crumbles to dust, and we can only do our best).

    Incidentally, there was a Zany Miéris, who appeared in at least one silent film of Mlle. Miéris' era. Stage actresses of that time, frequently appeared in early examples of the "new" motion picture medium and though we have no established connection, "Zany" makes a wonderful nickname for Suzanne, don't you think?

    Because there is no photographer attribution on the card, we're guessing this wonderful montage image was created, by the Kunzli brothers, from an original portrait by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris, who definitely produced a number of images of Miéris in this costume.

    The Kunzli brothers, Karl and Max, of Zurich Switzerland, were in the art publishing business as early as the 1870s. Small wonder then, that when the postcard craze occurred at the turn of the century, they jumped in with both feet. Also, their experience in art publishing (they were particularly well known for their top notch chromolithographs), gives us a better understanding of the very "pictorialist" quality of many of their photographic images. This one is more reminiscent of Reutlinger's own photo-montage renditions of his portrait work, but still has very much the feel of the Kunzli brothers' work. Gorgeous. This card was published by their French satellite, Kunzli Freres (Kunzli Brothers, or just KF of Paris). minor wear to edges and corners, and a gentle thumb crease in the center, and another in the lower right hand corner. If you collect Mlle. Miéris images, please note that despite the card's minor faults, in some years of combing through these wonderful old Belle Epoque cards, this is the only time we've come across this particular card, or for that matter, a shot of her in this particular pose, making this one, for us at least, a rarity.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    39.00 USD

    Great autographed card. A rare, early silver screen item.

    Lucy Doraine was a very popular star of the silent screen. She was born Ilona Kovacs in Budapest, Hungary in 1898. We've recently heard from one of our wonderful customers that her full name was in fact Ilona Kovacs Perenyi, and that she was the daughter of a Baron Perenyi. We'll be checking out this new information, and are always grateful for the interest you take in our shop!

    Between 1918 and 1931, she appeared in 24 films. First in Hungary, then Germany, and finally in Hollywood. Early in her career, between 1918, and 1923, she was married to a fellow Hungarian who would become the famous Hollywood director, Michael Curtiz (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, Casablanca).

    Miss Doraine would not fare so well in Hollywood, unfortunately, and with the advent of the new "talking pictures" faded from popularity. We don't find a lot of history on her beyond her retirement from the screen in the 1930s. She passed away in California, in 1989.

    This card though, dates back to the height of her fame, circa 1925, when she had her own film company in Europe, was considered one of the sexiest ladies of the silver screen, and called all her own shots.

    Wonderfully decorative signature in blue ink.

    Many thanks to Wikipedia for most of our biographical info!

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    26.00 USD

    While searching for old postcards of girls and their dolls, we found a number of cards like this one, showing images of WWI era soldiers having their picture taken with a doll. If we'd found just the one, it wouldn't have seemed that remarkable, but finding several in a general search definitely piqued our interest. This is a particularly interesting one in that the doll being held by the soldier on the left, is easily identifiable as a "boudoir doll."

    Boudoir dolls are a highly collectible item these days, and were all the rage with the "Jazz Babies" of the 1920s. These charming (though often uncanny looking) dolls were in some ways symbolic of the cultural liberation (some might say "libertinism") of the period.

    Carried along by young ladies to the ball, carnaval, or fete, they took the place of Cousin Bette, or Aunt Margaret, who in past decades would have acted as chaperones, guaranteeing the good behavior of their wards.

    Instead, the very presence of the boudoir doll in a girl's arms was in some ways a declaration that she was chaperone free, and "thoroughly modern" (some of these dolls even smoked little cigarettes!).
    Of course, aside from these cultural implications which may or may not have applied in individual cases, boudoir dolls were also simply a stylish young lady's accoutrement, though a very unique one when viewed through the lens of our present day experience.

    In this card, we have combined, a WWI era image of soldiers playing around in front of the camera, with a rare image of one of those highly collectible dolls. The other doll may be a Pierrot. That one is a bit difficult to make out.

    Wonderful historical artifact! There is a smudge on the reverse side of this card, but otherwise it is in very nice condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Lovely image, classical motif, might have been produced a decade earlier, but is dated on the reverse 1920. So charming. The jeweled teardrop clasp at her shoulder is amazing.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Ah, romance, plucking passion's purple plum :) Lovely Pierrot image published by Alfred Noyer of Paris.

    Following the "Great War" (1914-1918), and by the time the 1920s rolled into view, a little of the gilding had begun to rub off the "golden age" of the picture postcard.

    Germany, whose technical and industrial prowess had made it the central hub in the wheel of the postcard industry had lost the war, and consequently some of the major players in that industry had changed.

    Generally, changing patterns in employment, looming economic depression, political upheaval resulting in the toppling of monarchs all over Europe, and technological advances making for a faster moving post-war world, all contributed to a slump in postcard collecting worldwide.

    Whether skilled colorists found better paying work elsewhere, or the struggling industry hired fewer of them (and spent far less on paints and dyes in an effort to cut costs), postcards decorated by the pochoir method (the French stenciling technique that required less time and skill from colorists), and monochrome tinted images like this one, became much more common. The bright, sometimes garish (don't we just love them :) colors caught the eye of the consumer, and they were much cheaper to produce. Still, these monochrome tints remain some of our very favorite cards, and we always love Pierrot and his friends :)

    A very nice unposted card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Charming! Gorgeously hand-colored Japanese picture postcard of three friends reading together.

    Sometimes it seems as though almost every other old Japanese postcard we find online that features girls or women as its subject, identifies them as "Geisha." Of course Geisha were and are (as you probably know), highly trained, professional entertainers. There are certainly postcard images of geisha out there, but calling every Japanese woman we see pictured in traditional costume a geisha, would be a little like calling every European woman we see pictured in the traditional costume of her country, a "Singer." It just ain't so :)

    Commercially produced picture postcards were not printed in Japan before 1900. In their initial format, as with early European picture postcards, they were produced with an undivided back, upon which (by postal regulation) no writing other than the recipient's address was allowed. Japanese postal regulations first allowed the divided back in 1907, and as in the case of this card, one third of the card's back side was allowed for personal communication or advertizing. In 1918, this portion was extended to one half of the card's back, helping us date our card to sometime between 1907, and 1918.

    Lovely condition on this one, with only minor rounding of the corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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