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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Setting: A Victorian Garden

    "Shall I pluck this tiny blossom, Mariette?" whispered Cybelline breathlessly, her pale cheeks flushing with anticipation, "For I confess, my hands do tremble, and I grow quite dizzy at the very prospect. Surely, we have ventured as far in this experiment as we dare,,,"

    "Do not be afraid, dear Cybelline," responded Mariette softly, but with an air of supreme confidence she hoped would embolden her friend. "You have only to pluck it gently, just so."

    "Like this?" ventured Cybelline with evident trepidation.

    "Oh, yes," Mariette responded happily. "You have it now," she encouraged. "Though the fruit of our actions may weigh heavily upon us, our hearts are strong, and besides," she continued. "Our plan was to balance as many of these roses upon our heads, as were left growing on this little bush, making little rose bushes of ourselves. And we have not gone nearly so far as that."

    "Of course you are right, my Dear," Cybelline said, laughing merrily at her friend's clever rejoinder. The lovely bell-like tones thus produced, were joined a moment later by Mariette's laughter as well, resulting in a complex harmony, complimented by the song of a dear little robin, perched in her nest nearby, as both young ladies returned to their innocent game with renewed vigor, and joyous abandon.

    Now you tell one :)

    Unidentified artistes, though the one on the left (from our perspective) closely resembles the artiste Mlle. Marville, and her friend next to her, Mlle. Carmen De Villers.

    No photographer attribution, either, darn it. Really a sweet image, published by Aristophot A.G. out of Leipzig, Saxony, and posted in 1905.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    The "big hat," of which the one our model wears is certainly an elegant example, hit the Edwardian fashion scene in 1907, with the opening of "The Merry Widow," a very popular light opera from the original German version, "Die Lustige Witwe."

    Lady Duff-Gordon, broadly known by her "brand" name as the internationally successful couterier, "Lucile," (her first name was, in fact, Lucy), designed a fancy, Gainsborough-esque broad-brimmed hat, dramatically plumed, for the operetta's star, Miss Lily Elsie.

    Though The Merry Widow was hugely popular on the stage, and the waltz of the same name it originated would be greatly loved for decades (and even still today), Mdme. Lucile's Merry Widow hat made an even bigger splash. It caught on almost immediately, and soon stylish women throughout Europe and the Americas were wearing them.

    Lucile was also responsible for streamlining clothing designs to better fit a woman's natural shape, and gentling out the exaggerated "S" curve of the very early 1900s. But, it was Paul Poiret of Paris, another famous fashion designer, who streamlined designs to what was at that time, a "figurative" minimum.

    Monsieur Poiret, who did NOT like big hats, and was heavily influenced by the "costumes orientales" of la Belle Epoque, opened the door to the narrow-bodied "flapper" style, and the bobbed hair to fit the turban, and the cloche hat, that so complimented his designs.

    So, it was "Fare thee well, Raphunzel," "Goodbye Miss Gibson," and "Hello, Boop Boop Ba-doop" :) Well okay, it didn't happen overnight, but it was in large part due to Monsieur Paul Poiret of Paris, that the British born trend of the often elegant, sometimes ridiculously top heavy, Merry Widow hat, though huge (forgive the pun :), from 1907, inevitably bowed to French fashion, and by the beginning of WWI (1914), was mostly being worn only by dear old Aunt Clarice.

    Thank goodness that viewing this all from a distance, we are not bound by any of those then-current trends, and can simply embrace all of it!

    A lovely card in excellent condition. We've not been able to locate any information on the publisher, K.& C.M. with its distinctive zeppelin design logo, but we recognize the beautiful young woman from a number of other "big hat" images, and believe this is a German card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    One of three wonderful risque flapper images produced by Ostra Studio that we just got into the shop. Lots of fun!

    Ostra Studio was operated by two brothers, Jacques and Charles Biederer (though Jacques is more often credited with being the photographer), immigrants to Paris from what was then the Kingdom of Bohemia before 1918, when it became Czechoslovakia.

    The history on them is a bit murky, but they are today (Jacques in particular) probably the best known Parisian producers of fetish photos during the 1920s and 30s. Pretty wild stuff at the time with rubber corsets, masters/slaves, etc., and lots of spanking, but most of the images we've seen seemed to be intent on maintaining a sense of humor as well.

    The two brothers were Jewish, and in the 1940s following the fall of Paris to the Nazis, they were arrested and deported to Auschwitz in Poland. Neither of them survived the Holocaust.

    Ostra Studio cards are much sought after, and though many of their more outré (always wanted to be able to use that word in a sentence :) images are a little out of our line, we do love our risque flappers, and are very pleased to have found this one!

    Great risque card in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    One of three wonderful risque flapper images produced by Ostra Studio that we just got into the shop. Lots of fun!

    Ostra Studio was operated by two brothers, Jacques and Charles Biederer (though Jacques is more often credited with being the photographer), immigrants to Paris from what was then the Kingdom of Bohemia before 1918, when it became Czechoslovakia.

    The history on them is a bit murky, but they are today (Jacques in particular) probably the best known Parisian producers of fetish photos during the 1920s and 30s. Pretty wild stuff at the time with rubber corsets, masters/slaves, etc., and lots of spanking, but most of the images we've seen seemed to be intent on maintaining a sense of humor as well.

    The two brothers were Jewish, and in the 1940s following the fall of Paris to the Nazis, they were arrested and deported to Auschwitz in Poland. Neither of them survived the Holocaust.

    Ostra Studio cards are much sought after, and though many of their more outré (always wanted to be able to use that word in a sentence :) images are a little out of our line, we do love our risque flappers, and are very pleased to have found this one!

    Great risque card in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Lovely image of two young Algerian dancers. Card is dated on the backside, 1925.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    Lebender Marmor, or Living Marble. One of a very popular postcard series in which the models, often in classical costume, were posed and made up to resemble marble statues. This one is a real beauty, and the silvering only serves to add to the image!

    See another card from the same series:

    https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/redpoulaine/tools/listings/stats:true/268159810

    Tableaux vivants are a form of performance art in which a costumed actor (in the case of the "tableaux," usually "actors plural") pose motionlessly, creating a scene from a painting, sculpture, etc., that is often recognizable and meaningful to the viewing audience. It puts us in mind of street artists painted in silver or white, and posing as statues for passing tourists at street fairs and the like.

    In the early 1900s, it was not uncommon to see tableaux vivants of favorite religious scenes, such as the last supper, or, for example, during the run-up to WWI, a tableau vivant of Washington crossing the Delaware created on the stage of a vaudeville theater in order to stir the patriotic blood of the audience and help out with the recruitment drive.

    Wikipedia notes, "The most recent heyday of the tableau vivant was the 19th century, with virtually nude tableaux vivants or poses plastiques providing a form of erotic entertainment."

    Even when legislation restricted risque performances in the theaters, it was difficult to shut down a nude tableau vivant or pose plastique (a term we believe was more commonly used to describe this type of performance by a single actor) when it was touted as a work of art!

    Our card demonstrates that the popularity of the pose plastique as a theatrical act carried over into picture postcards. We run across these fairly often, with the Lebender Marmor series being one of the nicest, we think.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    This superb image of an Algerian woman in fine costume, is one of four wonderful postcards we are featuring this week that deserve attention for a couple of reasons beyond the beauty of the images themselves.

    First, they fall under the category of what French deltiologists (otherwise known as "postcard geeks," like us :), call "précurseurs,"
    a term applied to early postcards printed prior to 1904, and having the undivided back side, which was by regulation reserved for the recipient's address only, and where no other text was allowed. This sometimes resulted in letters composed in tiny script, swirling around the images on the face of these cards in wonderfully inventive ways, creating their own little mixed media art form that is perhaps appreciated by no one but us! (kidding...there are others out there :)

    But these particular cards, produced probably in the late 1890s, and being examples of some of the very earliest "picture postcards," provided ample space on their faces for written communication. Cards of this type are not rare, by any means, but it is especially nice finding such wonderful examples that have not been written on.

    The second point of interest is in the image subject generally. Algeria had been one of France's colonies for about 70 years at the time these photos were taken.
    Because most of our cards are of French stage performers from the period known as the "Belle Epoque," images of women in colonial Algiers taken during that period, in native dress, are particularly interesting to us.

    This is because so much of the art and entertainment media in France during la Belle Epoque, drew freely upon elements of native Algerian dress in the creation of what is sometimes called the "costume orientale," a particularly evocative, sexy (sometimes just plain silly, from our modern perspective), and romantic style of theatrical costume. This variety of costume was used in ballet and opera, in bawdy vaudeville productions, solo interpretations of traditional dance (including belly dancing, of course), promotional and advertising material by great masters like Alphonse Mucha, fine art paintings and sculptures submitted to the Paris Salon, and of course, photographs (many of which were turned into examples of one of our favorite mediums of small, popular art, the postcard :).

    Jean Théophile Geiser 1848-1923 moved with his family, while a very young child, from his native Switzerland to Algeria in the early 1850s. By the late 1860s he had opened his own photography studio and over the next half century enjoyed great success, both in the winning of international awards for his work, and financially, through the sale of countless of his photographic images on picture postcards.

    Though probably best known today for his "ethnic" nudes and costumed dancers, the popularity of which in France, no doubt played a great role in the prevalence of the "costume orientale" and "haremesque" imagery in Belle Epoque art and theater, he also traveled extensively throughout the east, photographing and writing on a broad array of subjects.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    We love the composition of this strange little RPPC. If it was just a snapshot of a man dancing in a brassiere, it might still be interesting, or not, depending on the context. After all, although we've never attended one personally, word is that this is a pretty common practice at "frat" parties! :)

    But the way this image really works for us, is not even at center stage, where the obvious action is taking place, but rather diagonally, between the two other men.

    We have first the spectator, in what was presumably modern, conventional dress (for circa 1940 Algeria, Morocco, or Egypt, just guessing), and then the seated man in the checked pants and loose white tunic, whose singing (and perhaps hand clapping) directs the dance.

    This might have been nothing more than a silly stunt, or these might be street entertainers, or the scene might have a cultural significance immediately apparent to someone more familiar with that place and time, but for us, the diagonal line between the two not-dancing men is a direct path through the looking glass, as it were. We become the spectator, standing outside, and peering into a place where up is down, standing is sitting, man is woman, and conventional dress becomes brightly patterned and ostentatious. Very weird and dream-like, and we love it!

    As with so many RPPCs, this is very possibly the only remaining example of this wonderful image in existence! We know nothing about any of the subjects, the photographer, or even the geographical location of this card's origin, only that it was produced on Agfa print stock (Actien-Gesellschaft für Anilin-Fabrikation). This was a very big German producer of photo chemicals and print paper that shipped worldwide, so no country of origin help there, but by the style of the "Agfa" mark on the back of the card, we can at least date the paper to pre-1945. Finally, the brassiere helps us narrow it down a bit. Apparently the "bullet" bra first surfaced in the late 1930s, but didn't really become popular until after WWII, so our photograph was probably taken sometime between 1939, when the bullet bra appeared, and 1944, the last year Agfa paper bearing the particular mark on the back of our card, was produced.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    7.00 USD

    This image of a beautiful young woman of the Ouled-Nails people of Algeria, dressed in all her finery, is one of four wonderful postcards we are featuring this week that deserve attention for a couple of reasons beyond the beauty of the images themselves.

    First, they fall under the category of what French deltiologists (otherwise known as "postcard geeks," like us :), call "précurseurs,"
    a term applied to early postcards printed prior to 1904, and having the undivided back side, which was by regulation reserved for the recipient's address only, and where no other text was allowed. This sometimes resulted in letters composed in tiny script, swirling around the images on the face of these cards in wonderfully inventive ways, creating their own little mixed media art form that is perhaps appreciated by no one but us! (kidding...there are others out there :)

    But these particular cards, produced probably in the late 1890s, and being examples of some of the very earliest "picture postcards," provided ample space on their faces for written communication. Cards of this type are not rare, by any means, but it is especially nice finding such wonderful examples that have not been written on.

    The second point of interest is in the image subject generally. Algeria had been one of France's colonies for about 70 years at the time these photos were taken.
    Because most of our cards are of French stage performers from the period known as the "Belle Epoque," images of women in colonial Algiers taken during that period, in native dress, are particularly interesting to us.

    This is because so much of the art and entertainment media in France during la Belle Epoque, drew freely upon elements of native Algerian dress in the creation of what is sometimes called the "costume orientale," a particularly evocative, sexy (sometimes just plain silly, from our modern perspective), and romantic style of theatrical costume. This variety of costume was used in ballet, opera, in bawdy vaudeville productions, solo interpretations of traditional dance (belly dancing, of course), promotional and advertising material by masters like Alphonse Mucha, fine art paintings and sculptures submitted to the Paris Salon, and, of course, photographs, many of which were turned into examples of one of our favorite mediums of small, popular art, the postcard :).

    The brothers Neurdein had a studio in Paris from 1863 until just before the outbreak of WWI. So though pre-dating it by a few years, their careers pretty much spanned the whole of La Belle Epoque. Etienne Neurdein (1832-after 1915) stayed primarily in Paris, taking portraits in the studio, while his brother Louis Neurdein (1846-after 1915) traveled widely, spending much of his time in Algeria. This image is one of Louis'.

    This card has some definite age spotting particularly evident in the blank area, and will be priced accordingly. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    This image of a young Algerian woman preparing to dance, is one of four wonderful postcards we are featuring this week that deserve attention for a couple of reasons beyond the beauty of the images themselves.

    First, they fall under the category of what French deltiologists (otherwise known as "postcard geeks," like us :), call "précurseurs,"
    a term applied to early postcards printed prior to 1904, and having the undivided back side, which was by regulation reserved for the recipient's address only, and where no other text was allowed. This sometimes resulted in letters composed in tiny script, swirling around the images on the face of these cards in wonderfully inventive ways, creating their own little mixed media art form that is perhaps appreciated by no one but us! (kidding...there are others out there :)

    But these particular cards, produced probably in the late 1890s, and being examples of some of the very earliest "picture postcards," provided ample space on their faces for written communication. Cards of this type are not rare, by any means, but it is especially nice finding such wonderful examples that have not been written on.

    The second point of interest is in the image subject generally. Algeria had been one of France's colonies for about 70 years at the time these photos were taken.
    Because most of our cards are of French stage performers from the period known as the "Belle Epoque," images of women in colonial Algiers taken during that period, in native dress, are particularly interesting to us.

    This is because so much of the art and entertainment media in France during la Belle Epoque, drew freely upon elements of native Algerian dress in the creation of what is sometimes called the "costume orientale," a particularly evocative, sexy (sometimes just plain silly, from our modern perspective), and romantic style of theatrical costume. This variety of costume was used in ballet and opera, in bawdy vaudeville productions, solo interpretations of traditional dance (including belly dancing, of course), promotional and advertising material by great masters like Alphonse Mucha, fine art paintings and sculptures submitted to the Paris Salon, and of course, photographs (many of which were turned into examples of one of our favorite mediums of small, popular art, the postcard :).

    Jean Théophile Geiser 1848-1923 moved with his family, while a very young child, from his native Switzerland to Algeria in the early 1850s. By the late 1860s he had opened his own photography studio and over the next half century enjoyed great success, both in the winning of international awards for his work, and financially, through the sale of countless of his photographic images on picture postcards.

    Though probably best known today for his "ethnic" nudes and costumed dancers, the popularity of which in France, no doubt played a great role in the prevalence of the "costume orientale" and "haremesque" imagery in Belle Epoque art and theater, he also traveled extensively throughout the east, photographing and writing on a broad array of subjects.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    This precious image of two young Algerian women, is one of four wonderful postcards we are featuring this week that deserve attention for a couple of reasons beyond the beauty of the images themselves.

    First, they fall under the category of what French deltiologists (otherwise known as "postcard geeks," like us :), call "précurseurs,"
    a term applied to early postcards printed prior to 1904, and having the undivided back side, which was by regulation reserved for the recipient's address only, and where no other text was allowed. This sometimes resulted in letters composed in tiny script, swirling around the images on the face of these cards in wonderfully inventive ways, creating their own little mixed media art form that is perhaps appreciated by no one but us! (kidding...there are others out there :)

    But these particular cards, produced probably in the late 1890s, and being examples of some of the very earliest "picture postcards," provided ample space on their faces for written communication. Cards of this type are not rare, by any means, but it is especially nice finding such wonderful examples that have not been written on.

    The second point of interest is in the image subject generally. Algeria had been one of France's colonies for about 70 years at the time these photos were taken.
    Because most of our cards are of French stage performers from the period known as the "Belle Epoque," images of women in colonial Algiers taken during that period, in native dress, are particularly interesting to us.

    This is because so much of the art and entertainment media in France during la Belle Epoque, drew freely upon elements of native Algerian dress in the creation of what is sometimes called the "costume orientale," a particularly evocative, sexy (sometimes just plain silly, from our modern perspective), and romantic style of theatrical costume. This variety of costume was used in ballet and opera, in bawdy vaudeville productions, solo interpretations of traditional dance (including belly dancing, of course), promotional and advertising material by great masters like Alphonse Mucha, fine art paintings and sculptures submitted to the Paris Salon, and of course, photographs (many of which were turned into examples of one of our favorite mediums of small, popular art, the postcard :).

    Jean Théophile Geiser 1848-1923 moved with his family, while a very young child, from his native Switzerland to Algeria in the early 1850s. By the late 1860s he had opened his own photography studio and over the next half century enjoyed great success, both in the winning of international awards for his work, and financially, through the sale of countless of his photographic images on picture postcards.

    Though probably best known today for his "ethnic" nudes and costumed dancers, the popularity of which in France, no doubt played a great role in the prevalence of the "costume orientale" and "haremesque" imagery in Belle Epoque art and theater, he also traveled extensively throughout the east, photographing and writing on a broad array of subjects.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    9.00 USD

    Precious! "Jeune Kabyle," or Young Kabyle, image of a pretty little girl in traditional dress. The Kabyle are a North African Tribal people who in years past were often referred to as "Berbers," because of the Afro-Asiatic Berber language that is still one of their their common languages today.

    Many of the Kabyle fought long and hard against the French colonization of Algeria beginning in the 1850s, and later, for Algerian independence from France.

    Photographs of the Kabyle people were very popular with postcard collectors in France, especially because of French colonial interests in North Africa. The influence of the music, dance, and the traditional costumes and jewelry of the Kabyle is very evident on many postcards depicting theatrical performers during la Belle Epoque. Many western European performers, like Cleo de Merode and Mata Hari, entertained audiences in the Parisian music halls and theaters with costumes and routines adapted from folk traditions around the world. This illustrates how colonialism not only benefited western nations politically and economically, but was a huge contributor to the cultural melange of those nations.

    A lovely card in very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Gorgeous hair! And a truly priceless expression.
    CDV (2 and 3/8 by 4 inches) by Ivan (Jvan) Standl of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Ivan Standl (1832-1897) was born in Prague, but is known to have been doing professional photographic work as early as the 1860s in Zagreb. As a portraitist and documentarian he won numerous international awards for his work. We really love this one :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Beautiful Panama hat! Kaiser Wilhelm mustaches, silk jacket, a striped, square-ended silk necktie in the popular two-color striped pattern that was popular in the 1880s and 90s, striped shirt (perpendicular to the tie's stripes of course...a fellow wants to be seen, after all...),
    a cummerbund showing a watch chain, striped pants (of course!), gloves, and a beautiful two piece (handle and shaft) walking stick trimmed from a tree bough, oiled and polished, with some hand-decoration on the top half.
    We are simply agog with admiration for this guy :) What panache! Wish we could check out his shoes!

    At a little under 2 by 4 and 3/4 inches this is a phenomenal portrait card circa 1890s, produced by Strauss and Company of Vienna Austria.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Just precious!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    33.00 USD

    In the 1870s, when Vienna was still a jewel in the crown of the Austro-Hungarian empire, There was a Herr Mahlknecht, well known as a theatrical portraitist (by which we mean he took pictures of "theater people," rather than actually taking pictures theatrically, which might have been fun to witness, anyway :)

    Beyond this, we have no history on him. Nothing on our model either. Was she actually a milk maid, paid a little something to pose in the studio? We can't say. Gorgeous photograph. Cabinet card of approx. 8 inches by 3 and 3/4 inches.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    ***Not a postcard in this case, but will be shipped securely at the same postage cost***

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    This jewel of a CDV (Carte de Visite sized cabinet card) is 2 and 1/4 by 4 inches. Gorgeous resolution, beveled and gilded edges don't show up to full effect on scan.
    Gjuro Varga, though one of the most respected portraitists in Zagreb from the 1870s, operated the studio in which this photo was made with his brother (no name immediately available) from 1893 to 1904, so we can safely date this one to the 1890s.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Lovely seductive image of artiste Myriel. We have no bio on this lovely Belle Epoque performer. We find her most often in maenad-type images, playing cymbals, or holding aloft the thyrsus of Bacchus. Often she is posed, like Doll, another favorite, in a woodland setting.
    A wonderful card in very wonderful condition with just a little wear to corners.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    36.00 USD

    This card is a special, special, treat! La Belle Oterita, who (we've only recently discovered) used to be billed as La Belle Otero's younger sister, was apparently dancing in Rio de Janeiro in September of 1906, when she received flowers from someone (presumably in the audience), and a request for a private audience.

    In the message she wrote on the front of the card, in the violet ink so popular at that time, she thanked them for the beautiful flowers, and wrote that she would await their visit! Now that is fun!! This card then, was seemingly not purchased by an admirer at the theater, or in a shop, but one the dancer herself had delivered to her admirer, inviting them to her dressing room after the performance!

    Was it a handsome gentleman? Would they perhaps have dinner together after the show? Or was it a young girl, an aspiring dancer, starstruck, and hoping for some professional advice? Who knows? Definitely a one of a kind card though, and we are very pleased to share it with you :)

    La Belle Oterita has been one of our favorites for quite some time. Though we don't personally see any close resemblance, her cards have frequently been mistakenly listed as images of the much better known Belle (Caroline) Otero, and we used to wonder if this extraordinarily cute dancer had chosen the name Oterita ("Little Otero"), intentionally associating herself with Otero in order to further her career. Well, now we know that the answer to that question is yes! But perhaps for a very good reason.

    Was she La Belle Otero's little sister? Why not? Caroline Otero had siblings, we know that, so it's certainly possible that a younger sister chose to follow in the famous dancer's footsteps. On the other hand, many performers have embellished their backgrounds in order to make themselves more fascinating to their audience, and it's seen not so much as a negative thing, as some dark deception, but rather as just another piece of "theater." :)

    A wonderful image by Gerlach of Berlin, and a wonderfully personal connection with the artiste, herself!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Helena Makowska was born in that part of Imperial Russia which is now the Ukraine, and was a great star of the Italian and German silents. Later in her life, at the outset of WWII, she was arrested in Berlin and confined for a long period of time to a German prison camp. Later released, she devoted much of her time, for the remainder of the war, to theater work on behalf of the allied war effort.
    Great image! Great card, with minor wear to corners and just a little romantic silvering :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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