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Recent listings from redpoulaine

older | 1 | .... | 147 | 148 | (Page 149) | 150 | 151 | .... | 242 | newer

    0 0

    24.00 USD

    In Ida Fuller, nee Pinckney, the well known Belle Epoque "interpretive" dancer, we have a very clear example of the competitive twists and turns that sometimes occurred between the stage performers of the Belle Epoque era.

    Ida Fuller became widely known for her "skirt" dancing, or "serpentine" dancing. This was a variety of dance which was developed by the famous dancer, choreographer, and inventor, Loie Fuller, a remarkable woman whose name became, in many ways, synonymous with Art Nouveau and the Belle Epoque.

    Volumes could be (and have been), written about La Loie, or Lo-Lo, as she was sometimes affectionately called. The style of dance she introduced to the world was much copied and imitated. Apparently scores of women claimed a close relationship, even using the last name of Fuller and claiming to be her sister. Most of these claims were illegitimate, but not Ida's.

    Not so much information can be found regarding Ida Fuller. She was born Ida Pinckney, in Forest City Iowa in 1867. In biographical articles concerning Loie Fuller, Ida is often dismissed as a mere imitator, a pretender to Loie's own unique art form, the serpentine dance, and it's sometimes suggested that Ida's "claims" that she was a relation of Loie's, were untrue.

    That Ida was a latecomer, who made use of Loie's already developed style to work out her own routines, is almost certain. To dismiss her as a mere imitator though, is probably not entirely fair.

    We did a fair amount of research on Loie and Ida. In fact, Ida Pinckney married Frank Rodney Fuller, Loie's elder brother, so she was a member of the family, at least by marriage.

    Frank was an electrician with extensive knowledge of Loie's lighting effects, as he was reputed to have been involved in her earliest successes with her dance routines.

    Additionally, the "Fire Dance," a routine for which Loie herself became very well known, and to whom its invention is generally credited, was, according to accounts written by contemporaries of these ladies, actually an invention not of Loie's, but of Ida's, who performed the routine widely, both in Europe, and in the United States. Apparently Ida eventually needed to go to court on a number of occasions in order to see her patents on her fire dance upheld.

    We don't even want to imagine the difficulties between Loie Frank and Ida that probably arose during those times, but despite the controversies, our researches have led us to believe it's only fair to give Ida her due as an artiste in her own right.

    This is a magnificent image by Georg Gerlach, circa 1905/10, of Ida Fuller in which she seems to be a goddess scattering clouds across the heavens! Lovely :)

    Minor wear to edges and corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Meyrianne simply could not bear the thought of being separated from her faux Grecian column! She'd named it Guillermo, and carried it with her everywhere. Guillermo had wonderful lines. Guillermo was strong and silent. He was also a great listener, and well, we all need someone to lean on...

    Cute risque lingerie image postcard in very nice, unposted condition, by the prolific publisher P-C Paris (Papeterie de Levallois Clichy of Paris)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    Wonderful find! Pre-1904 undivided back card, which allowed for no writing on the backside apart from the recipient's address. So, messages were written on the front, and publishers had all sorts of ideas about the way those messages could be decoratively framed. Here is an example in about as near to perfect condition as anyone could wish for. NPG (Neue Photographische Gesellschaft) of Berlin, published this wonderful series in which the hair of various artistes just grows out of control and acts as a frame for the sender's message. Our fourth listing image is of one card out of this series (not our card, and not for sale) picturing, we believe, Liane de Vries. That image will give you an idea of the way these cards were often used. Most of these we find are already written on like this one.

    In the case of the card we're offering though, the artiste is none other than Cleo de Merode. For collectors of her images, this may be exciting, as we don't expect that we'll ever run across this card again in this condition. Very pleased to share it with you!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    26.00 USD

    In terms of the Russian Theater, this magnificent card is an important historical artifact for a number of reasons.

    The play, Anatema, was written by Leonid Andreyev, a greatly loved writer, and close friend of Maxim Gorky.

    Its story cast Russian Jews in a particularly sympathetic light, which amidst the political turmoil of the time, during which antisemitism was rife, helped pave the way for improved state relations with Russia's Jews and mold the future of Russia politically.

    The play was produced at the Moscow Art Theater, which Constantin Stanislavski (one of the foremost fathers of modern Russian theater) helped to found in 1898.

    Actor, Vasily Ivanovich Kachalov, pictured on our card, was one of Stanislavski's most favored students. He made his debut at the Moscow Art Theater in 1900, playing the part of Tsar Berendey in Ostorovski's "The Snow Maiden," directed by Stanislavski himself.

    Stanislavski's wife, Maria Lilina, who played the part of the Snow Maiden, fell in love with Kachalov during the play's production, and reportedly had an affair with him. Nine years later, however, Kachalov was still performing at the Moscow Art Theater, and Maria Lilina remained Stanislavski's lifelong companion, so apparently everything worked out for the three in the long run.

    Finally, we are including as one of our listing images (though obviously not for sale) a drawing by Kazimir Severinovich Malevich, the famous avant-garde painter, who rather clearly, worked from this very image when composing his portrait of Kachalov.

    Very nice, unposted condition on this card.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we occasionally post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more.


    0 0

    36.00 USD

    as per convo


    0 0

    33.00 USD

    Three little gems here! Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey these are NOT! But then, that's part of the charm :) We only have space in our listing images to show one of the backs, and of course we show the autographed one.
    This identifies this little series as being from the "Teatro Comico," a relatively popular name at the time. This show could have taken place in Italy or Spain, or it could have been a traveling show set up just about anywhere!
    The card is dated 1920, so the photos themselves were probably made in the later 1910s.

    Some minor wear to edges and corners, but overall a lovely little collection of probably very rare circus RPPCs in very nice condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Lots of fun! Wonderful tone on this risque lingerie image by P-C Paris (Papeterie de Levallois Clichy of Paris).
    Very, very nice condition on this vintage 1920s French postcard.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Very nice condition on this card. There is obviously some kind of a large spot on the back side, that doesn't seem to cause any problem with the card's image.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Very nice condition on this card, but with a mark, that although faint in person, is very visible on our scan, and unfortunately in her facial area.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Lovely condition on this card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers. Love that pointy chignon on her wig! Wonderful :)
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Lovely condition on this card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Wonderful image of a beautiful young woman in gorgeously sensible Victorian attire. German photo by Dresden photographer Edgar Schmidt, taken probably sometime in the late 1890s.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    "Borellismo was a word used in Italy in the teens to describe the Lyda Borelli craze. Girls went on diets and strove to imitate her twisted postures. She was like a decadent version of the Pre-Raphaelite beauty--thin, with wavy blond hair and strange but picturesque poses. She portrayed characters who were doomed and otherworldly, often bordering on the supernatural. Her Rapsodia Satanica (1915), a compelling film about an old woman who makes a pact with the Devil for eternal youth, is an splendid introduction to this fascinating star."

    Above quote from a short article about Lyda Borelli at http://web.stanford.edu/~gdegroat/borelli.htm.

    Lyda Borelli was so wonderful. If you venture into the wildwood of Youtube and search for her, you will be well rewarded. Lots of beautiful clips to enjoy. Brief observation though, we managed to watch a wonderful, partially-tinted copy of Rapsodia Satanica, and Lyda Borelli, at least in this film, was not thin! She was deliciously beautiful, her portrayal wondrously evocative, but if anything, she was downright zaftig! Very nice card with Signorina Borelli posing on a camelback couch in a gorgeous gown with a fringed bodice and some lovely lace trimmings!
    By the way, if you ever happen to visit Saragozza, in Bologna (in northern Italy), she is still revered there, and you can visit Casa Lyda Borelli, and soak up the Borellismo! :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Wonderful hand-coloration on this Japanese card that shares so many beautiful smiles! Posted in 1921, this appears to be a commercially used card, sent by a travel booking agent, to confirm reservations aboard a steam ship bound for...it doesn't say...Japan?

    A very nice posted card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    We adore the print quality on the cards that were produced by Cinemagazine!

    The gorgeous Miss Naldi was born in 1894 in New York City, into a working class Irish family as Mary Dooley. Times were tough. In 1910, her dad ran off, her mom died five years later, and to support her two teen-aged siblings, Mary worked as a cloak room attendant and an artist's model. She gravitated toward dance, was a Ziegfeld girl in 1918, and then in 1920 started appearing in film. She had a pretty good decade of work, but although her voice had a nice quality, she never made a talkie. Miss Naldi passed away in New York City, in 1961.
    Every bit of this bio was drawn from Wikipedia's deep, deep wellspring of knowledge. Thanks as always, Wikipedia!

    A very nice, unposted card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Elise De Vere (born Constance), was one of the premiere stars of her time. Born in Belgium, she was the daughter of Herbert Shakespeare Gardiner Williams (aka Charles De Vere) and Julia Ferrett, his wife. Both of them were ex-pat British stage magicians, who wandered the world, when not running magic shops! Though they spent years away, she and her family maintained their "British-ness," and never gave up their citizenship. In the Paris of the time (of today, for that matter), there were numerous communities of residents from "away" who maintained close ties to their cultural origins. The Deveres, for example, regularly attended services at a local Anglican church, or so we have been told. The fact is, that a number of big French music halls were owned by English theatrical promoters during this period, some of whom exported English performers to France (early "British invasion" :), just as France exported theirs to England. After all, the channel is not so wide.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-tinted image of unidentified corseted artiste, Mlle. Meryl, in a beautiful calf-length costume. performing at the Scala, one of the many wonderful Parisian Caf' Conc' of the period.
    We don't often come across these Oricelly masterpieces so marvelously tinted. This one was printed in Germany by N.P.G. (the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft), one of the most prolific postcard publishers of the time, which turned out fine quality silver-bromide photo print postcards, utilizing technology originally developed in the United States, but improved upon and patented in Germany (but that's another story :). This particular image is an oranotype, a photo printing process used with, as you can see, great success by N.P.G.
    It was not uncommon for "identified" images, originally published in France by houses like S.I.P., in black and white, to be printed in a tinted version by a company like N.P.G., and for that version to lack attributions for the artiste or photographer. Understandable at that time, when these performers might have been very well known, the practice nevertheless resulted in enticing mysteries just waiting for us to solve :)
    A lovely card, in very nice posted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Lovely Jugendstil image titled Esther by Austrian painter Adolf Hering (1863-1932). Hering was probably best known for his painting of "Death and the Maiden," 1900. He was also an illustrator and painted images directly for postcards.

    Notice that the back of this card is divided, but that the front keeps a space for the sender's message (the blank strip) typically present on earlier cards with undivided backs, when no personal messages were allowed on the backsides of cards, but only the address to which it was being sent.
    This suggests that this card's front was designed prior to 1906, when Germany adopted the divided back card, but that it was published just after this point.

    The card was posted by a soldier stationed in the field with an artillery regiment, no charge being applied as a service to active military.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    In close to the pristine condition it was in on the day it was published, here is a very cute risque postcard, hand-painted, of a flirtatious woman in partial undress. We're guessing this was produced in the 1910s during the war years. Such wonderful condition!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    48.85 USD

    as per convo


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