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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    59.00 USD

    Lot of three Lilian Harvey cards as per convo.

    Great image of Lilian Harvey from Ross Verlag of Berlin, circa 1931/32.

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lilian Harvey could play sexy, or sweet, or sexy and sweet, but never particularly vampy, or at least not that we've seen. Mostly known as a musical comedy star, she filled a place in late Weimar era Germany that actresses like Ruby Keeler filled in the US during that period of economic and cultural depression when people badly needed a bright and happy, optimistic, character to cheer them through the tough times, and the roles she played provided a necessary contrast to the often dark, "femme fatale" characters played by other German actresses of the same period, like the great Marlene Dietrich.

    Miss Harvey led a fascinating life. She was born to an English mother and a German father in 1906, in London, but by the time WWI broke out, she was living with her family in Germany. She became a successful singer, dancer, and silent film actress in Vienna and Germany, made the transition to the talkies easily, and actually starred opposite Laurence Olivier in his film debut, an English version of a very successful German film called Hokuspokus in which she'd played the leading lady.

    She was one of those people of conscience who though happy to play a part for her movie-going audience, was unwilling to act as a puppet for the state. In the late 1930s, after having been closely watched by the Gestapo for years as a result of her close associations with Jewish friends and politically dissident associates, she went out on a limb for one of them who'd been arrested, managed his release, and after his escape from Germany, she was pretty much forced out of the country herself and forced to leave her substantial fortune behind. Please read the Wikipedia article for so much more!!!

    Below is a link to Youtube, and a clip from the film Die Drei von der Tankstelle (The Three from the Gas Station), a very popular musical produced in 1930, that will give you an idea of Fraulein Harvey's charms. Playing opposite her is Oskar Karlweis, a popular song and dance man of the 20s and 30s, who like so many others, was forced to flee Germany when Hitler came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri0sPJV3NGI

    On the back side of the card are some remnants of old-fashioned black album paper. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    54.00 USD

    Lot of 3 Lilian Harvey cards, as per convo.

    Stunning portrait of Lilian Harvey by Henri Manuel's studio in Paris, circa 1930 and posted from Dubrovnik in 1932. The font on the card's face is pretty much identical to that used on many cards published by Alfred Noyer, but no attribution there. In our experience, this is a scarce Harvey image, most of her cards we've come across having been published by Ross in Berlin, or Iris in Austria.

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lilian Harvey could play sexy, or sweet, or sexy and sweet, but never particularly vampy, or at least not that we've seen. Mostly known as a musical comedy star, she filled a place in late Weimar era Germany that actresses like Ruby Keeler filled in the US during that period of economic and cultural depression when people badly needed a bright and happy, optimistic, character to cheer them through the tough times, and the roles she played provided a necessary contrast to the often dark, "femme fatale" characters played by other German actresses of the same period, like the great Marlene Dietrich.

    Miss Harvey led a fascinating life. She was born to an English mother and a German father in 1906, in London, but by the time WWI broke out, she was living with her family in Germany. She became a successful singer, dancer, and silent film actress in Vienna and Germany, made the transition to the talkies easily, and actually starred opposite Laurence Olivier in his film debut, an English version of a very successful German film called Hokuspokus in which she'd played the leading lady.

    She was one of those people of conscience who though happy to play a part for her movie-going audience, was unwilling to act as a puppet for the state. In the late 1930s, after having been closely watched by the Gestapo for years as a result of her close associations with Jewish friends and politically dissident associates, she went out on a limb for one of them who'd been arrested, managed his release, and after his escape from Germany, she was pretty much forced out of the country herself and forced to leave her substantial fortune behind. Please read the Wikipedia article for so much more!!!

    Below is a link to Youtube, and a clip from the film Die Drei von der Tankstelle (The Three from the Gas Station), a very popular musical produced in 1930, that will give you an idea of Fraulein Harvey's charms. Playing opposite her is Oskar Karlweis, a popular song and dance man of the 20s and 30s, who like so many others, was forced to flee Germany when Hitler came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri0sPJV3NGI

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Lilian Harvey in Black Cutaway Gown, German Postcard by Ross Verlag, circa 1931/1932

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lilian Harvey could play sexy, or sweet, or sweet and sexy, but never particularly vampy, or at least not that we've seen. Mostly known as a musical comedy star, she filled a place in late Weimar era Germany that actresses like Ruby Keeler filled in the US during that period of economic and cultural depression when people badly needed a bright and happy, optimistic character to cheer them through the tough times. The roles she played provided a necessary contrast to the often dark, "femme fatale" characters played by other German actresses of the same period, like the great Marlene Dietrich.

    Miss Harvey led a fascinating life. She was born to an English mother and a German father in 1906, in London, but by the time WWI broke out, she was living with her family in Germany. She became a successful singer, dancer, and silent film actress in Vienna and Germany, made the transition to the talkies easily, and actually starred opposite Laurence Olivier in his film debut, an English version of a very successful German film called Hokuspokus in which she'd played the leading lady.

    She was one of those people of conscience who though happy to play a part for her movie-going audience, was unwilling to act as a puppet for the state. In the late 1930s, after having been closely watched by the Gestapo for years as a result of her close associations with Jewish friends and politically dissident associates, she went out on a limb for one of them who'd been arrested, managed his release, and after his escape from Germany, she was pretty much forced out of the country herself and forced to leave her substantial fortune behind. Please read the Wikipedia article for so much more!!!

    Below is a link to Youtube, and a clip from the film Die Drei von der Tankstelle (The Three from the Gas Station), a very popular musical produced in 1930, that will give you an idea of Fraulein Harvey's charms. Playing opposite her is Oskar Karlweis, a popular song and dance man of the 20s and 30s, who like so many others, was forced to flee Germany when Hitler came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri0sPJV3NGI

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Gorgeous image of Lilian Harvey from the late 1920s, one of our very favorites, and in almost pristine condition. Published by Heinrich Ross of Ross Verlag.

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lilian Harvey could play sexy, or sweet, or sexy and sweet, but never particularly vampy, or at least not that we've seen. Mostly known as a musical comedy star, she filled a place in late Weimar era Germany that actresses like Ruby Keeler filled in the US during that period of economic and cultural depression when people badly needed a bright and happy, optimistic character to cheer them through the tough times, and the roles she played provided a necessary contrast to the often dark, "femme fatale" characters played by other German actresses of the same period, like the great Marlene Dietrich.

    Miss Harvey led a fascinating life. She was born to an English mother and a German father in 1906 in London, but by the time WWI broke out she was living with her family in Germany. She became a successful singer, dancer, and silent film actress in Vienna and Germany, made the transition to the talkies easily, and actually starred opposite Laurence Olivier in his film debut, an English version of a very successful German film called Hokuspokus in which she'd played the leading lady.

    She was one of those people of conscience who though happy to play a part for her movie-going audience, was unwilling to act as a puppet for the state. In the late 1930s, after having been closely watched by the Gestapo for years as a result of her close associations with Jewish friends and politically dissident associates, she went out on a limb for one of them who'd been arrested, managed his release, and after his escape from Germany, she was pretty much forced out of the country herself and forced to leave her substantial fortune behind. Please read the Wikipedia article for so much more!!!

    Below is a link to Youtube, and a clip from the film Die Drei von der Tankstelle (The Three from the Gas Station), a very popular musical produced in 1930, that will give you an idea of Fraulein Harvey's charms. Playing opposite her is Oskar Karlweis, a popular song and dance man of the 20s and 30s, who like so many others, was forced to flee Germany when Hitler came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri0sPJV3NGI

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!lilian harvey


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    We just love this smile. This card was printed circa 1932/33 by Ross Verlag just a short time before Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party took control of Germany.
    Heinrich Ross, the founder of Ross Verlag, had only a few short years remaining at the helm of his company. In 1937, because Herr Ross was Jewish and Jews as of that date were by law no longer allowed to own businesses in Germany, he lost his company and most of its assets.
    He did manage to escape with his life, however, and wound up working as a machinist in Chicago into his old age. A wonderfully detailed bio of Heinrich Ross is available at the site rosscards.com. Just follow the link below. Great site we use frequently in our research.

    http://rosscards.com/HeinrichRoss.html

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lilian Harvey could play sexy, or sweet, or sexy and sweet, but never particularly vampy, or at least not that we've seen. Mostly known as a musical comedy star, she filled a place in late Weimar era Germany that actresses like Ruby Keeler filled in the US during that period of economic and cultural depression when people badly needed a bright and happy, optimistic, character to cheer them through the tough times, and the roles she played provided a necessary contrast to the often dark, "femme fatale" characters played by other German actresses of the same period, like the great Marlene Dietrich.

    Miss Harvey led a fascinating life. She was born to an English mother and a German father in 1906, in London, but by the time WWI broke out, she was living with her family in Germany. She became a successful singer, dancer, and silent film actress in Vienna and Germany, made the transition to the talkies easily, and actually starred opposite Laurence Olivier in his film debut, an English version of a very successful German film called Hokuspokus in which she'd played the leading lady.

    She was one of those people of conscience who though happy to play a part for her movie-going audience, was unwilling to act as a puppet for the state. In the late 1930s, after having been closely watched by the Gestapo for years as a result of her close associations with Jewish friends and politically dissident associates, she went out on a limb for one of them who'd been arrested, managed his release, and after his escape from Germany, she was pretty much forced out of the country herself and forced to leave her substantial fortune behind. Please read the Wikipedia article for so much more!!!

    Below is a link to Youtube, and a clip from the film Die Drei von der Tankstelle (The Three from the Gas Station), a very popular musical produced in 1930, that will give you an idea of Fraulein Harvey's charms. Playing opposite her is Oskar Karlweis, a popular song and dance man of the 20s and 30s, who like so many others, was forced to flee Germany when Hitler came to power.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri0sPJV3NGI

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    A lovely Clara Bow image. One of the biggest stars of the silent era. If you're familiar with the term "It" girl, well, she was the first one!

    Born into poverty and misery, she did the best she could with her beauty, energy, and never-give-up attitude, and she did really damn well! Wikipedia offers a fine bio on their page with lots of information. It's a bit depressing...she really did have a rough time, so don't go there unless you're ready for it.

    You could also follow the link below to Youtube and watch "It," the silent romantic comedy that pushed her over the top and into stardom.
    It's lots of fun, with a very nice musical track (something that can really make or break the experience of watching a silent film for us). A very simple plot, basic romance, but what is often said about Miss Bow is evident in this movie, she really did raise the entire film up with her presence, and shone.
    Incidentally, Louise Brooks, a big name among film buffs and collectors these days, recalled Clara Bow as being a tremendously important part of the silent era, and loved this film particularly. Bring popcorn :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4MOQSRC_bM

    A very nice card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    as per convo


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    No history we've found on the charming Miss Doré. We'll keep looking, though.
    Wonderful Art Nouveau border really makes this a striking card!

    On the reverse side of the card, note "For Inland Use Only." This text was applied to cards printed in England after 1902, and before 1904. Why? Because a man in England named Frederick Hartmann came up with the idea of the divided back postcard, which would allow senders to write messages (or even to place advertisements) on the backs of postcards where before only the recipient's address was allowed.

    This was just fine in England, but the rest of the world lagged behind just a bit, France not allowing the divided back until 1904, Germany, 1905, and the United States, 1906. So, what happened if a person in England sent a divided back card to someone in France in those early days? The French postal authorities affixed an added fee to the card, payable upon delivery!

    A very nice card, very evocative of the time and with a nice bit of postal history too :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    "Hmmm...let me think about that...um...no!" :)

    Gorgeously colored card! Gorgeous Irma de Lafere. The capital letter I, as it was often printed then, can sometimes suggest to us a capital J, or T, but we've seen several other images of this lovely artiste.

    We can't find any history on her though, so she remains for us the mostly mysterious subject of this beautiful, and superbly hand-colored, image.

    The card was published by Monsieur G. Piprot of Marque (or logo) "Etoile," (Star) publishers in Paris, from a photograph taken by one of our favorite photographers, Professor Edward Stebbing.

    Professor Stebbing was a prolific portraitist, who operated a studio out of Boulevard des Italiens et 30 Rue Grammont, Paris, France. He is a bit of a mystery man, as we have found quite a number of references to him pertaining to photography of the period, but no biography as of yet.

    Presumably because of his studio address, he is often called a French photographer, but we do know that Stebbing is a common enough English name, that in the 1870s, he was a regular contributor to the British Journal of Photography (in fact, he was that magazine's "Paris correspondent" for a time), made regular trips to England, and since, in writing about him, and quoting him, the Journal referred to him as "Professor" and not "Professeur," we suspect he was an expatriate Englishman who made his home in Paris.

    Also, like so many of those early photographers, Stebbing was an inventor. In those days, photographers who were more than dabblers, were inventors almost out of necessity. It was often through experimentation with the vast number of chemicals and broad (and constantly "newfangled") varieties of equipment, that advances in their art were accomplished.

    Edward Stebbing is sometimes called the inventor of the first "roll film" camera. He developed the camera in 1883, which by 1887 was retailing for about twelve dollars. Below, there is a link to the George Eastman House Technology Archive where you can learn more about it. Also, the fourth of our listing images (though not offered for sale) is one of Prof. Stebbing's camera! It is a thing of beauty :)

    http://www.geh.org/fm/brownie2/htmlsrc/mS810500001_ful.html

    A lovely, unposted card, showing off Stebbing's (and Piprot's) talent for toying with the development and printing processes in a way that particularly lent itself to brilliant coloration. The term, "Emaillographie," printed on the reverse of the card, refers to a process of Monsieur Piprot's that seems to have been a glacé, or glaze, applied to the surface of the print. This technique really seems to have added depth, and also brilliance to the coloration, of those cards to which it was applied.

    Gorgeous card in near fine condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Beautifully hand-tinted image of Mlle. Lucy Jousset, a lovely French stage, and silent film, actress. Amazing costume!

    Very few of Mlle. Jousset's fans ever realized that she was actually the 900 year old lovechild of an ancient dragon and her lover, a wandering Templar knight. If you look closely at the train of her gown, you may glimpse the outline of her tail. Rumor has it that despite the negative reputation accorded most half-dragons, Mlle. Jousset was very kindly disposed, and occasionally quite generous with her treasures!

    This card was published by Monsieur G. Piprot of Marque (or logo) "Etoile," (Star) publishers in Paris, from a photograph taken by one of our favorite photographers, and one of the most sought after theatrical portraitists of the time, Leopold Reutlinger.

    Monsieur Reutlinger's photographs, in their postcard format, were usually published by S.I.P. (Société Industrielle de Photographie) in France, and N.P.G. (Neue Photographische Gesellschaft) in Berlin, but not always, as we see here. This card was apparently one of a series of Reutlinger images published by Marque "Etoile" of Paris.

    The term, "Emaillographie," printed on the reverse of the card, refers to a process of Monsieur Piprot's that seems to have been a glacé, or glaze, applied to the surface of the print. This technique really seems to have added depth to, and also brilliance to the coloration, of those cards to which it was applied.

    Gorgeous card in near fine condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Beautiful Stebbing image of a Springtime beauty, possibly an unidentified image of Mlle. Carmen De Villers.

    The card was published by Monsieur G. Piprot of Marque (or logo) "Etoile," (Star) publishers in Paris, from a photograph taken by one of our favorite photographers, Professor Edward Stebbing.

    Professor Stebbing was a prolific portraitist, who operated a studio out of Boulevard des Italiens et 30 Rue Grammont, Paris, France. He is a bit of a mystery man, as we have found quite a number of references to him pertaining to photography of the period, but no biography as of yet.

    Presumably because of his studio address, he is often called a French photographer, but we do know that Stebbing is a common enough English name, that in the 1870s, he was a regular contributor to the British Journal of Photography (in fact, he was that magazine's "Paris correspondent" for a time), made regular trips to England, and since, in writing about him, and quoting him, the Journal referred to him as "Professor" and not "Professeur," we suspect he was an expatriate Englishman who made his home in Paris.

    Also, like so many of those early photographers, Stebbing was an inventor. In those days, photographers who were more than dabblers, were inventors almost out of necessity. It was often through experimentation with the vast number of chemicals and broad (and constantly "newfangled") varieties of equipment, that advances in their art were accomplished.

    Edward Stebbing is sometimes called the inventor of the first "roll film" camera. He developed the camera in 1883, which by 1887 was retailing for about twelve dollars. Below, there is a link to the George Eastman House Technology Archive where you can learn more about it. Also, the fourth of our listing images (though not offered for sale) is one of Prof. Stebbing's camera! It is a thing of beauty :)

    http://www.geh.org/fm/brownie2/htmlsrc/mS810500001_ful.html

    A lovely, unposted card, showing off Stebbing's (and Piprot's) talent for toying with the development and printing processes in a way that particularly lent itself to brilliant coloration. The term, "Emaillographie," printed on the reverse of the card, refers to a process of Monsieur Piprot's that seems to have been a glacé, or glaze, applied to the surface of the print. This technique really seems to have added depth, and also brilliance to the coloration, of those cards to which it was applied.

    Gorgeous card in near fine condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    The Thief of Bagdad, an all time favorite silent film, was directed by Raoul Walsh in 1924. Packed with special effects that still fill one with awe today, it is a truly magical example from the great era of silent film.

    Follow the link below to see the full length film on Youtube. A wonderful print with a soundtrack that makes use of the gorgeous Scheherazade, a symphonic suite composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1888. This is an investment in time. Two and a half hours long, but very well worth it. Mr. Fairbanks is at his dashing best, Julanne Johnston is lovely, and look out for an appearance by Anna May Wong as a Mongol slave girl!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFOjCXzaOgA

    A great unposted card in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    "Apres vous, Mesdames et Messieurs." :)

    Wonderful details in this great time machine card. The clean white cloth for brushing the crumbs off of the patron's chair before seating them is held under the arm, just so! Note the creases running across the abdominal area in the jacket of the head bellman and his assistant. Would this be from bending at the waist to lift the guests luggage and setting it down in their rooms? Perhaps a fair amount of polite bowing, as well.

    If you have ever seen, up close, clothing manufactured in this period, you will possibly remember how heavy was the cloth from which it was made. Not all, of course. Fine gowns could be as sheer and light as anything, but everyday working clothes were certainly made to withstand heavy use.

    We have recently altered the specifications of our time traveling device so that the scanning apparatus which reads the "connecting element" in order to properly set the date and location, which we initially constructed so that it could accommodate coins and stamps, but nothing larger than that, (it is one of the most expensive parts in the entire machine!) can now scan a postcard.

    This is a great improvement, particularly when using an RPPC such as this one. Since most RPPCs were produced in smaller, local, studios, and in limited runs, their use allows us to pinpoint, with relative accuracy, our destination period and location. Of course there is the difficulty presented by what we have termed the rule of "tandem origin," the fact that sometimes we travel to within thirty meters, or so, of the photographer, at the very moment he (or she) is taking the picture (the ideal result), while at other times, we arrive near the darkroom wherein, and at the time, the photograph was actually developed! We haven't yet been able to isolate this variable!

    If you travel as we do, please DO use actual postcards produced in the appropriate period and location! family photographs are a very "iffy" proposition. Just a few months ago we made a journey (ostensibly) to Chicago Illinois, Summer of 1909, making use of a family photograph. It would have been so wonderful! Clear day, city park, bandstand, picnics and parasols. Of course we dressed carefully for the part, and then we arrive where? Dawson City, Canada, 1979, in the middle of a snowstorm, with two hours to wait before automatic return. Brrr. We were not dressed for the trip! You see, the photograph we used, was one developed from the negative by a descendant of one of the photograph's subjects, who at three in the morning, in the middle of a snowstorm, took it into his head to play in his darkroom.

    The story got pretty complicated, as you might imagine, Lots of questions, the old "got lost on the way home from the costume party" excuse, etc. But he did put a generous shot of whiskey in that herbal tea. Anyway...be careful!

    A very nice card for traveling, or just staying at home. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    One of four wonderful early French postcards we recently acquired. The image is of a dancer in "costume orientale" lounging around with a very good friend...her parrot! Beautifully subtle coloration.
    We originally believed this to be a hand-tinted photo-lithograph, But are pretty certain this is rather a heliotype. Related, but one of the major differences is that the plate produced during the heliotype process allows for a maximum of only about 2000 runs per image before it degrades (this was in the early 1900s) to the degree that a new plate must be produced. Also, rather than being hand-tinted, per se, layers of colored inks are overlaid during the printing process. If examined closely, the areas where heavier colored inks were overlaid onto thinner ones are evident, but in clearly "blocked" areas, rather than showing the sort of feathering so often evident in the kind of hand-tinting by done by brush.

    In the search for a practical "color" photo-reproduction, the heliotype was an important step along the way. It took between one and two days for the chrome alum solution (a chief characteristic of the process) to dry and harden sufficiently onto the plate for printing, so it was a slow, and relatively low yield process, but as you can see, produced wonderful results.

    This same model changes her costume for one of a farm girl in a haystack in another group of cards we just acquired. It makes us wonder if both series might have been photographed on the same day. Please follow link below to see that one:

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/157873994/little-girl-blue-risque-french-heliotype?ref=shop_home_active_1&ga_search_query=little%2Bgirl%2Bblue

    The corners are a bit soft on all four of these cards. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Regina Badet, born in 1876, in Bordeaux, was a principal dancer at the Grande Theatre de Bordeaux by the age of 14. By 1900, she had begun a career as an actress and dancer in Paris. She was a star of the Opera Comique in Paris and eventually traveled the world as an international star. She also appeared in the medium of film beginning in 1908, making a number of silent movies.

    In the 1920s, Mlle. Badet quietly retired from stage and screen. She died where she had been born, at the age of 73, in Bordeaux, France.
    Many thanks to Wikipedia for much of our biographical information.

    An exquisite image by Monsieur Bert of Paris, who for some time worked with Monsieur Paul Boyer. The portrait itself has a modern feel, and puts us in mind of some of those later portraitists like Avedon!

    Wonderful condition. There is just enough silvering around the edges to lend its own magic to the image. For those not familiar with the term, "silvering" refers to the action of the light-sensitive metallic salts of silver (and other metals used in the photographic process), initially held in suspension in a gelatinous surface material on the photo print paper. These slowly migrate to the surface of the print over time (in this case, a little over a hundred years), producing this magical effect. We LOVE it! (personal preference) On the other hand, we've had customers who actually apply a chemical wash to remove much of the silvering, thereby restoring the photographic print to something much closer to its original state. This could be a practical course, when coming across very old photographs in which the silvering has run amok and the image details have become so clouded as to be completely hidden from view, but we've never had to resort to it, and in some ways this practice, barring extrem examples of silvering, feels a little to us like polishing the patina from antique metal objects. Again, simply a matter of personal preference.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Welcome to our artifacts section. We decided we needed a place to showcase unusual items that present, beyond what they are themselves, unique historical qualities. Over time, we'll be shifting our autographed postcards into this section, as well as listing other very special items.

    We have often said that these postcards of theatrical acts were not only sold to the theater-going audience as souvenirs, but that we'd also thought such cards might have been used by the performers' agents as a means of promoting them.

    Here at last we have some evidence of this! This is a card bearing an image of "Mad. Tillier's 5 Yankee Kids." Now presumably this was a song and dance quintette playing the vaudeville circuit in the pre-war 1910s. Mad. (possibly short for Madeleine?) Tillier would have been the manager, perhaps the choreographer too, we haven't found any history on this act. On the back of the card we discovered that Mad. Tillier him/her-self actually sent this very card to none other than Monsieur Raoul Pitau, who at that time was a theatrical impressario (da guy what puts da shows together) of some note in Paris.

    Even though we have a little German, and like everyone else, access to Google translate, be darned if we can make out Mad. Tillier's hand writing, so we don't know exactly what the letter says, but it would appear to be an arrangement of some sort relating to the act, 5 Yankee Kids. If you can translate this one for us, please do!

    Having been mailed from Germany, the postcard was then received by Monsieur Pitau in Paris, which we can see, thanks to his big capital "R" mark scribbled with a date on the back of the card, indicating that this was a standard method of business communication. The "R" might well stand for Raoul, signed, as it was, with a flourish, or simply for "Recu" (French for received). Such communications were no doubt filed away for use in putting future shows together.

    If the "R" is Raoul Pitau's mark though, then this card bears not one, but two autographs of historical note! A little piece of vaudeville history we can hold in our hands, really quite a find! We can practically smell the greasepaint :)

    By the way, we learned of Raoul Pitau, the "Impressario," that he was "bald as an ostrich egg, though with a magnificent forelock," and that once at a charming hotel in Nice, after plying a woman he had met on the train with wine and rum all through the night, and just at the moment of grand romantic consummation (no specific details here) an earthquake struck the city and the couple were thrown to the floor and ran, along with many others, outside to a park to be safely away from tall buildings, window glass, walls, etc. (of course we can't help but wonder if this experience didn't offer those two a rather ironical experience of the old phrase, "The earth moved." :)

    Anyway, the story goes on to say that when the earth did finally stop shaking, and things seemed to have returned to normal, and the two lovers realized that their fiery passions remained yet unquenched, they returned to the hotel post haste in order to resume their play of affections.

    And yet, once back inside their cozy nest, and once again at that most critical of moments, a second shock wave struck the city, driving them again out into the street! Mon Dieu! It was at this point that they bowed to fate inexorable, bid one another fair adieu, and parted company forever.*

    We found this little tale of romance a la Belle Epoque in a piece out of a journal by someone named Paulus, a theatrical personage in his own right. Paulus was a cafe concert performer who apparently benefited over many years from the talent management and close personal friendship of Monsieur Pitau, who he remembered "writhed" with frustration at the recollection of this incident.
    Below is a link to the site where we found this story.

    http://www.www.dutempsdescerisesauxfeuillesmortes.net/fiches_bio/paulus/memoires/paulus_memoire_28.htm

    A very nice card, rare, rich in history, and one of a kind, with only minor wear to edges and corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Julien Francois Bioletto of Lyon took this photograph. We have no history on him yet. There is little enough easily accessible information on the photographers of Paris, and when it comes to those people who lived and worked in the smaller cities, information is often difficult to find.

    We have listed a number of postcards made from his photographs in the past, as Lyon clearly had a vibrant theater scene, and many of the biggest names that appear on our cards photographed by Reutlinger or Boyer, appeared not only in Paris, but also in Lyon.

    This is a wonderful image of two couples dancing the Mattchiche, a dance frequently described as a Brazilian tango that was particularly popular at that time.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Wonderful! Great pose, expressions, costumes, etc. Amateur dance troupe (though perhaps not so amateur) posing in costume for Monsieur Etienne Pinet, a local photographer who would also do weddings.

    On the back of the card, in the ubiquitous violet ink we so love, Jeanne, who was probably one of these dancers, wrote what translates as, "Remember your friend. Friendship and good kisses, Jeanne."

    We just love this :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    What a gorgeous print! We haven't found any history on the printer/publisher "Europe," but will keep looking. The print quality is similar to some of the higher quality film star images that came out of France in the 20s, like many of those published by Alfred Noyer, and Cinemagazine Editions of Paris. The similarity between the "Europe" logo and the logo of "Croissant," has us wondering if the two companies might have been related.

    Often considered in her day to be the most beautiful woman in Hollywood, Anita Page (1910-2008) was one of the most successful Hollywood actresses at the end of the silent era. At the height of her popularity she received more fan mail than any MGM actress with the exception of Garbo.

    She had a short term affair with Clark Gable, was proposed to through the mail by Benito Mussolini, and according to a disclosure by her in an interview she gave many years later, refused the sexual advances of MGM bigwig Irving Thalberg, a choice she said, that cost her her career as a film actress and resulted in her early retirement at the age of 23.
    (Thanks to Wikipedia for our bio information on this actress. There's lots more on the Wikipedia page devoted to her.)

    What a wonderfully off-kilter smile she has in this image. A very nice card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    We have always loved this series of images by Walery of the mysteriously veiled Mlle. Fiska. Not that she was veiled in some mysterious way or that there is any mystery behind the fact that she is veiled...it is just a veil, after all...simply that being veiled, she assumes a mysterious quality...well, it's at least a very interesting image...but never mind, we were just pulling the proverbial leg. That is not to say that your leg is necessarily proverbial, or anything other than an ordinary leg... but yes, we were pulling it. Sorry :) We couldn't find any history on Mlle. Fiska, you see, and felt we needed to put something in this listing, so there we are!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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