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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    22.00 USD

    A hush falls over the audience. Even the calliope has ceased its melodious charms. The ringmaster, with an almost sinister air of mystery, removes his tall black silk hat and bows deeply. The air is heavy with the smells of freshly roasted peanuts and apples, popcorn, sawdust, the manure of animals, the sweat of a closely packed crowd. All eyes are glued to the center ring, in delighted anticipation of the unknown. What thrilling spectacle is about to unfold? We can expect tightrope-walkers, acrobats, dancers from strange and forbidden kingdoms, that daring young man, or woman, on the flying trapeze, jugglers and clowns. We are under the big top, the largest tent on the circus grounds, its central pole as big around as the trunk of a great tree, reaching from the eye-dazzling lights and sequined costumes in the central ring, up, up into the heights of impenetrable darkness and gloom.
    In this section, "Under the Big Top," we hope to entice you with romantic images of circus performers, and of variety artists, whose acts appeared on the bills not only of circuses, but of those variety shows that played on a stage, at a time when the movie industry was still in its earliest infancy, when, before the advent of television, or even radio, entertainment was always live.

    We know nothing about these two sombre fellows, but acts that performed in vaudeville, often performed in circuses, and t'other way 'round. See the unicycles there as well?

    Very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    A few weeks ago we went off in search of old postcards with images of little girls and their dolls. Well, we found a number of them and made a few customers happy, but we also found a few somewhat related cards, sort of on the margin of "Girls and their Dolls," like this one!

    So very sweet, and yet a little uncanny! We love it! Two little girls, presumably sisters, in matching outfits. One is wearing a rosary and the other wears what appear to be religious medallions.

    Now, we are by no means horror movie fanatics, but we do have to ask, would these two little sweeties seem so terribly out of place if they suddenly appeared down at the far end of a long hallway in a spooky old hotel, calling out, "Come play with us...come play with us..." Brrr! :)

    Definitely a rare, very possibly a one of a kind, image. Hope you enjoyed it!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    While searching for old postcards of girls and their dolls, we found a number of cards like this one, showing images of WWI era soldiers having their picture taken with a doll. If we'd found just the one, it wouldn't have seemed that remarkable, but finding several in a general search definitely piqued our interest.

    In this image, three soldiers from different outfits are enjoying a little time away from their duties. Why the doll? Well, on a card we listed previously, there was a communication on the back of the card, in which another "soldier with doll" wrote to his girl back home, saying (in so many words) he hoped it was okay that he'd met someone with the same lovely figure and face to spend time with, haha. Follow below link to see that listing:

    https://www.etsy.com/transaction/1091874799

    Perhaps this was just a popular tease at the time. We're still researching it, but it certainly makes for an interesting image.

    As with so many RPPCs, this card may be the only surviving example of this image. Historically fascinating and true rarity. Very nice unposted condition.

    As with so many RPPCs, this card may be the only surviving example of this image. A true rarity. Very nice unposted condition.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    95.00 USD

    Fabulous find! Louise Brooks in her birthday suit! It's hard enough finding nice postcards of this iconic silent screen actress, but nude? Just wow.

    Though not attributed, the style and format of this portrait published by A. Noyer of Paris suggests that the photographer was J. Mandel. She wears a beauty mark, which though a very common face decoration for the era is, as far as we know, an unusual look for her. The tiny black spot on her chin is a fault on the card's surface. The bruisey shadow beneath the lower lip is not a fault, but relatively common in images of Miss Brooks. We don't know if it is just the shape of her chin and lower lip that frequently casts shadow there in photographs, or if possibly she applied lip rouge generously in that area to accentuate the pout.

    This is an unidentified image, always more of a treat when we find them! Kinda like finding buried treasure :) We've included a couple of additional Louise Brooks images in our listing images, not for sale, but to help with identification. Still, we suggest you go online and sift through images of her (Google her by name and hit "images"). We're completely satisfied that this is Louise Brooks, but please satisfy yourself.

    Below is a link to the 1929 silent film "Pandora's Box" based on Frank Wedekind's play. Probably her best known film and a lovely print with a nice soundtrack. Enjoy!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JajPa69djTA

    A wonderful card with some wear to edges and considerable wear to corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Such a cute image :)

    Mlle. Parisys (1893-1986) was born Marcelle Josse. She took the name Parisys as a performer in the 1910s. Though she was primarily a stage actress, she became quite popular as a music hall performer in the 1920s, playing all the big Parisian nightspots and touring internationally as well.

    She appeared in a few motion pictures, married Robert Trebor, the manager of Théatre Michel in Paris and upon his death in 1942, took over management of the theater. She maintained that position until 1967, when she retired.

    This postcard is a little oddly sized, being about a quarter inch narrower than average and about a quarter inch longer too!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Pola Negri, born Apolonia Chalupiek in 1897 Poland rose out of poverty and began her performing career as a ballerina. She was struck by tuberculosis, however, and had to give up dancing. She became for a time one of the most popular femme fatales in Hollywood.

    She had a long affair with Charles Chaplin, and then Rudolf Valentino, apparently they were lovers until his death in 1926. She was one of the two major femme fatales at Paramount studios, (Gloria Swanson being the other), and according to Chaplin, Paramount dreamed up all kinds of false rivalry and jealousy between Pola and Gloria for publicity purposes.

    To give an indication of the way Pola felt about Valentino, here is a quote attributed to Pola Negri, that we found on the great blog:

    http://classicglamourchic.blogspot.com/2010/12/pola-negri-talks-more-about-meeting_20.html

    "Before he could say another word, we were interrupted by an exceedingly beautiful young blonde. She said in a thick accent, "Rudy, please take me home now. I've an early call in the morning."
    Valentino asked, "Do you two know each other? Pola Negri -- Vilma Banky."

    "I said good night and watched the striking couple walk away. She was one of his favorite leading ladies, and there were many rumors of a romance, which I found myself alternately hoping were true and resenting. I wondered if I was subconsciously jealous but quickly dismissed that as being out of the question. It was no more than a passing physical attraction. There had been my reaction to the way he led me across the floor, merely physical again. No, I had to admit he appealed to something deeper, something atavistic, something so basic in me that I had forgotten it was there, if, indeed, I had ever known it. It stripped away the veneers that went into the composition of my too public self, and exposed what lay beneath. Call it fatalism, but from our very first meeting I knew that somehow this man had the power either to destroy my life or so irrevocably alter its course that it would never again be the same."

    Maybe these were Miss Negri's thoughts? Maybe they read well in a movie magazine...either way, just fun :)

    A great card in very nice unposted condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    This is one of our favorites. What a smile :)

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Pola Negri, born Apolonia Chalupiek in 1897 Poland rose out of poverty and began her performing career as a ballerina. She was struck by tuberculosis, however, and had to give up dancing. She became for a time one of the most popular femme fatales in Hollywood.

    She had a long affair with Charles Chaplin, and then Rudolf Valentino, apparently they were lovers until his death in 1926. She was one of the two major femme fatales at Paramount studios, (Gloria Swanson being the other), and according to Chaplin, Paramount dreamed up all kinds of false rivalry and jealousy between Pola and Gloria for publicity purposes.

    To give an indication of the way Pola felt about Valentino, here is a quote attributed to Pola Negri, that we found on the great blog:

    http://classicglamourchic.blogspot.com/2010/12/pola-negri-talks-more-about-meeting_20.html

    "Before he could say another word, we were interrupted by an exceedingly beautiful young blonde. She said in a thick accent, "Rudy, please take me home now. I've an early call in the morning."
    Valentino asked, "Do you two know each other? Pola Negri -- Vilma Banky."

    "I said good night and watched the striking couple walk away. She was one of his favorite leading ladies, and there were many rumors of a romance, which I found myself alternately hoping were true and resenting. I wondered if I was subconsciously jealous but quickly dismissed that as being out of the question. It was no more than a passing physical attraction. There had been my reaction to the way he led me across the floor, merely physical again. No, I had to admit he appealed to something deeper, something atavistic, something so basic in me that I had forgotten it was there, if, indeed, I had ever known it. It stripped away the veneers that went into the composition of my too public self, and exposed what lay beneath. Call it fatalism, but from our very first meeting I knew that somehow this man had the power either to destroy my life or so irrevocably alter its course that it would never again be the same."

    Maybe these were Miss Negri's thoughts? Maybe they read well in a movie magazine...either way, just fun :)

    A great card in lovely unposted condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    It's not that often that we bring photo-lithographs into the shop because the quality of the print is sometimes lacking, but in the case of some we find, and definitely in this case, the medium of ink on paper adds to the image rather than detracting from it. The fine stippling of ink (what I suppose we'd call a dot matrix today) lends a misty, magical, quality to the image that a photograph would not achieve in quite the same way. Anyhow...we love it :)

    This image is all about texture. The model's hair, the lace she wears, the feathers on her hat, it's so wonderful. Of course in the case of Charles Collas and Company of Cognac (the 4 c's on their logo), they had plenty of experience in fine detail printing, since before they became involved in the postcard boom at the turn of the 20th century, they were printers of finely detailed labels for the countless bottles of cognac produced in that region! As postcard printers, they were innovative, prolific, and their cards are much valued by a significant group of collectors today.

    Such a lovely card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Pola Negri, born Apolonia Chalupiek in 1897 Poland rose out of poverty and began her performing career as a ballerina. She was struck by tuberculosis, however, and had to give up dancing. She became for a time one of the most popular femme fatales in Hollywood.

    She had a long affair with Charles Chaplin, and then Rudolf Valentino, apparently they were lovers until his death in 1926. She was one of the two major femme fatales at Paramount studios, (Gloria Swanson being the other), and according to Chaplin, Paramount dreamed up all kinds of false rivalry and jealousy between Pola and Gloria for publicity purposes.

    To give an indication of the way Pola felt about Valentino, here is a quote attributed to Pola Negri, that we found on the great blog:

    http://classicglamourchic.blogspot.com/2010/12/pola-negri-talks-more-about-meeting_20.html

    "Before he could say another word, we were interrupted by an exceedingly beautiful young blonde. She said in a thick accent, "Rudy, please take me home now. I've an early call in the morning."
    Valentino asked, "Do you two know each other? Pola Negri -- Vilma Banky."

    "I said good night and watched the striking couple walk away. She was one of his favorite leading ladies, and there were many rumors of a romance, which I found myself alternately hoping were true and resenting. I wondered if I was subconsciously jealous but quickly dismissed that as being out of the question. It was no more than a passing physical attraction. There had been my reaction to the way he led me across the floor, merely physical again. No, I had to admit he appealed to something deeper, something atavistic, something so basic in me that I had forgotten it was there, if, indeed, I had ever known it. It stripped away the veneers that went into the composition of my too public self, and exposed what lay beneath. Call it fatalism, but from our very first meeting I knew that somehow this man had the power either to destroy my life or so irrevocably alter its course that it would never again be the same."

    Maybe these were Miss Negri's thoughts? Maybe they read well in a movie magazine...either way, just fun :)

    A great card in very nice unposted condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    This is one of our favorites. What a smile :)

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few diva's of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Pola Negri, born Apolonia Chalupiek in 1897 Poland rose out of poverty and began her performing career as a ballerina. She was struck by tuberculosis, however, and had to give up dancing. She became for a time one of the most popular femme fatales in Hollywood.

    She had a long affair with Charles Chaplin, and then Rudolf Valentino, apparently they were lovers until his death in 1926. She was one of the two major femme fatales at Paramount studios, (Gloria Swanson being the other), and according to Chaplin, Paramount dreamed up all kinds of false rivalry and jealousy between Pola and Gloria for publicity purposes.

    To give an indication of the way Pola felt about Valentino, here is a quote attributed to Pola Negri, that we found on the great blog:

    http://classicglamourchic.blogspot.com/2010/12/pola-negri-talks-more-about-meeting_20.html

    "Before he could say another word, we were interrupted by an exceedingly beautiful young blonde. She said in a thick accent, "Rudy, please take me home now. I've an early call in the morning."
    Valentino asked, "Do you two know each other? Pola Negri -- Vilma Banky."

    "I said good night and watched the striking couple walk away. She was one of his favorite leading ladies, and there were many rumors of a romance, which I found myself alternately hoping were true and resenting. I wondered if I was subconsciously jealous but quickly dismissed that as being out of the question. It was no more than a passing physical attraction. There had been my reaction to the way he led me across the floor, merely physical again. No, I had to admit he appealed to something deeper, something atavistic, something so basic in me that I had forgotten it was there, if, indeed, I had ever known it. It stripped away the veneers that went into the composition of my too public self, and exposed what lay beneath. Call it fatalism, but from our very first meeting I knew that somehow this man had the power either to destroy my life or so irrevocably alter its course that it would never again be the same."

    Maybe these were Miss Negri's thoughts? Maybe they read well in a movie magazine...either way, just fun :)

    A great card in lovely unposted condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    Steamy, but really, if we take a close look at the expressions on the faces of the two models, doesn't it look as if they were both stifling giggles? We really love the casually tied scarf, the underarm hair, such an everyday people image rather than carefully arranged :)

    Nice condition on this uncommon, risque, French postcard. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Edward Knoblauch, an American (later British) play-write, wrote Kismet in 1911. It was a great success, running in London for two years, and in New York as well.

    It was translated and produced in French also. This lovely card offers us an image of the two leads in the 1913 French production, Mlle. Jeanne Desclos and M. Lucien Guitry. The play opened in Paris at the Sarah Bernhardt Theater.

    One review we found in "Le Théatre," lauded the performances of the actors, but dismissed the play as being of the childish stuff of then present-day popular English plays and suggested that they would have been more impressed with it had the plot been more original and not simply drawn from the kind of thing one might read in "The Arabian Nights." We did get the impression from a number of other sources that "Kismet" did not do particularly well in France.

    The play was popular enough in England and America though, that it spawned a later musical and two motion pictures as well. We've seen the 1944 film version, starring Ronald Coleman and Marlene Dietrich. We love both of these stars and though we think both of them, by 1944, were a bit past the "costume romance" stage of their careers, it's still a lot of fun.

    Below is a link to a clip from the movie, with Marlene in a fantastic costume orientale, in a dance scene that diehard Dietrich fans will no doubt enjoy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tb038dGWI8E

    For us, this vintage postcard is simply a wonderful couples romance item. Hope you love it too :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    "Actually, when I told you my morning coffee was an important ritual," began Justine, "I wasn't speaking metaphorically at all! There's nothing quite like starting each day fresh as a newborn babe, sky-clad except for my favorite shoes, and approaching an altar draped in rich velvets with an offering of strong coffee. Quirky, you say? Perhaps, but it works for me."

    Great fun :) J. Mandel did such beautiful work. Very nice condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    26.00 USD

    Such a coy flapper! Lovely lingerie. Very cute boudoir image by J. Mandel, published by A. Noyer in the 1920s.

    From photo-image postcards of artwork shown in the Salon de Paris, gorgeous nudes by J. Mandel and other fine photographers, to light-hearted, pochoir decorated, couples romance cards, A. Noyer was one of the most prolific producers of fine quality, silver bromide photo postcards produced in France in the 1920s. Always one of our favorites.

    When, years ago, we began dealing in vintage French postcards, the most commonly available information was that the A in A. Noyer stood for Alfred. Lately, it's becoming more common to see him referred to as Armand. Because this information comes to us often from collector and dealer sites in France, and because Monsieur Noyer was, after all, French (at least that seems most likely), we're inclined to think Armand is probably correct. On the other hand, not all French sources seem to agree on this at the present time, so until we come across some real evidence in the form of his full name appearing on some verifiable printed matter of the period, we're going avoid any debate and stick with just plain old A. Noyer :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Elise De Vere (born Constance), was one of the premiere stars of her time. Born in Belgium, she was the daughter of Herbert Shakespeare Gardiner Williams (aka Charles De Vere) and Julia Ferrett, his wife. Both of them were ex-pat British stage magicians, who wandered the world, when not running magic shops! Though they spent years away, she and her family maintained their "British-ness," and never gave up their citizenship. In the Paris of the time (of today, for that matter), there were numerous communities of residents from "away" who maintained close ties to their cultural origins. The Deveres, for example, regularly attended services at a local Anglican church, or so we have been told. The fact is, that a number of big French music halls were owned by English theatrical promoters during this period, some of whom exported English performers to France (early "British invasion" :), just as France exported theirs to England. After all, the channel is not so wide.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    6.00 USD

    Wonderful image of a beautiful young woman in gorgeously sensible Victorian attire. German photo by Dresden photographer (or publisher) Edgar Schmidt, taken probably sometime in the late 1890s.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.


    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Very nice condition on this card. There is obviously some kind of a large spot on the back side, that doesn't seem to cause any problem with the card's image.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Very nice condition on this card, but with a mark, that although faint in person, is very visible on our scan, and unfortunately in her facial area.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers.
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Lovely condition on this card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Méaty (presumably pronounced "may-ah-tee," but sometimes spelled "Miati," too, which would sound more like "Mee-ah-tee," ) is a particular favorite of ours. Don't you just love the smoky look she gives the camera?

    Mlle. Méaty Fleuron was the little sister of Marguerite Rauscher, better known as Lise Fleuron, a very popular music hall queen of la Belle Epoque. Both of these sisters would seem to have enjoyed their greatest popularity in the late 19th century, Lise began in the 1880s and Méaty in the '90s. Though we find very little history on either performer, they almost certainly were performing into the early 1900s, since their postcards continued to be produced during that time, selling in great numbers. Mlle. Méaty clearly took a page from her more famous sister's book, and made great use of the plunging neckline, but unlike Mlle. Lise, we seldom catch her smiling brightly. Like Paul and John of the beatles, Lise was the "cute" one, and Méaty, the "moody" one :)

    This image, like many of her photo portraits, was probably made by Monsieur Oricelly of Paris who seems to have been one of her favorite photographers. Love that pointy chignon on her wig! Wonderful :)
    The Parisiana, a caf'conc (cafe concert), and one of the establishments where Mlle. Fleuron was performing when this card was printed, was a popular night spot on the Boulevard Poissoniere in Paris. It was built in the early 1890s, was closed by the prefect of police because of problems with "security" (a bit of an "unwholesome" atmosphere, possibly? but no details) and was turned into a cinema with 1500 seats in the early 1910s.

    A brief word on the cafe-concert. As English speakers, when we think of these night spots we often think "music hall." The music hall though, was a British import of the 1890s, an establishment offering variety entertainment that charged admission at the door like the modern theaters we're more used to. Having paid admission, the patrons filled the seats and enjoyed the show.

    The caf'conc, on the other hand, is often thought to better represent the kind of entertainment we associate with Paris of la Belle Epoque. Though also an entertainment venue, a caf'conc was initially a place that served food and drink (probably with focus on the drink) and where acts were booked to keep the patrons entertained. The caf'conc often offered other diversions, certainly in addition to the tables where patrons were served, there were dance floors, even ballrooms, sometimes beautiful gardens with shady, secluded spots where patrons could enjoy whispers and kisses. Simple playground fun, slides and swings, even grand carousels. This made for a less controlled, sometimes a bawdier atmosphere, while the music halls, though they offered the same sort of lively entertainment onstage, had the patrons seated in the auditorium, and were naturally more staid. It was in the late 1800s that a change from caf'conc to music hall gradually occurred (an early "British invasion" with many of Paris's favorite establishments being owned and operated by British theatrical entrepreneurs ), and by WWI, with the curtain closing on the "Beautiful Era," the grand cafe concerts of la Belle Epoque were mostly memories of a bygone time.

    Lovely condition on this card! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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