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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We found a small cache of 1920's Ross Verlag postcards depicting scenes from Fritz Lang's German Expressionist film masterpiece "Die Nibelungen."

    Also, below are three Youtube links to the film. The first (as indicated) offers English subtitles and combines parts one (Siegfried) and two (Kriemhild's Revenge), but the print quality is a little poor.

    The two links below that one are for parts one and two separately, offer no English subs, but are the magnificent restoration version accomplished by the F.W. Murnau Society in 2010. For this restoration, a photo-chemical rather than digital process was employed, resulting in something as close to the original film-goer's experience as possible.

    If you're not a German speaker (or reader) this requires some dedication and focus on context, to say nothing of an almost five hour time investment! But do check it out for a few minutes at least. It's truly gorgeous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnXruo9FlQ (English Subtitles)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNa74OevW_c
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jhb2mjjx-E (photo-chemical restoration)

    Lang's "Die Nibelungen" was based on the 13th century (or earlier) epic poem, the Nibelungenlied, and is often, though it really shouldn't be, confused with Wagner's "Ring Cycle." Wagner certainly drew upon the Nibelungenlied as one of his sources, but the stories really aren't the same. The film's script was written by Thea von Harbou, a screen writer, novelist and actress.

    Thea von Harbou and Lang were a married couple incidentally, and were also the writer and director of the German Expressionist classic "Metropolis" in 1927 and the chilling "M" in '31.

    Fritz Lang was one of many in the German film industry who left Germany after the Nazis came to power. He went on to direct films in Hollywood, some of which are now classics in the "Film Noir" genre. (Our favorite of those we've seen is definitely "The Big Heat." Awesome movie! )

    Each of these cards is in really very nice condition! Spectacular!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We found a small cache of 1920's Ross Verlag postcards depicting scenes from Fritz Lang's German Expressionist film masterpiece "Die Nibelungen."

    Also, below are three Youtube links to the film. The first (as indicated) offers English subtitles and combines parts one (Siegfried) and two (Kriemhild's Revenge), but the print quality is a little poor.

    The two links below that one are for parts one and two separately, offer no English subs, but are the magnificent restoration version accomplished by the F.W. Murnau Society in 2010. For this restoration, a photo-chemical rather than digital process was employed, resulting in something as close to the original film-goer's experience as possible.

    If you're not a German speaker (or reader) this requires some dedication and focus on context, to say nothing of an almost five hour time investment! But do check it out for a few minutes at least. It's truly gorgeous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnXruo9FlQ (English Subtitles)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNa74OevW_c
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jhb2mjjx-E (photo-chemical restoration)

    Lang's "Die Nibelungen" was based on the 13th century (or earlier) epic poem, the Nibelungenlied, and is often, though it really shouldn't be, confused with Wagner's "Ring Cycle." Wagner certainly drew upon the Nibelungenlied as one of his sources, but the stories really aren't the same. The film's script was written by Thea von Harbou, a screen writer, novelist and actress.

    Thea von Harbou and Lang were a married couple incidentally, and were also the writer and director of the German Expressionist classic "Metropolis" in 1927 and the chilling "M" in '31.

    Fritz Lang was one of many in the German film industry who left Germany after the Nazis came to power. He went on to direct films in Hollywood, some of which are now classics in the "Film Noir" genre. (Our favorite of those we've seen is definitely "The Big Heat." Awesome movie! )

    Each of these cards is in really very nice condition! Spectacular!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We found a small cache of 1920's Ross Verlag postcards depicting scenes from Fritz Lang's German Expressionist film masterpiece "Die Nibelungen."

    Also, below are three Youtube links to the film. The first (as indicated) offers English subtitles and combines parts one (Siegfried) and two (Kriemhild's Revenge), but the print quality is a little poor.

    The two links below that one are for parts one and two separately, offer no English subs, but are the magnificent restoration version accomplished by the F.W. Murnau Society in 2010. For this restoration, a photo-chemical rather than digital process was employed, resulting in something as close to the original film-goer's experience as possible.

    If you're not a German speaker (or reader) this requires some dedication and focus on context, to say nothing of an almost five hour time investment! But do check it out for a few minutes at least. It's truly gorgeous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnXruo9FlQ (English Subtitles)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNa74OevW_c
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jhb2mjjx-E (photo-chemical restoration)

    Lang's "Die Nibelungen" was based on the 13th century (or earlier) epic poem, the Nibelungenlied, and is often, though it really shouldn't be, confused with Wagner's "Ring Cycle." Wagner certainly drew upon the Nibelungenlied as one of his sources, but the stories really aren't the same. The film's script was written by Thea von Harbou, a screen writer, novelist and actress.

    Thea von Harbou and Lang were a married couple incidentally, and were also the writer and director of the German Expressionist classic "Metropolis" in 1927 and the chilling "M" in '31.

    Fritz Lang was one of many in the German film industry who left Germany after the Nazis came to power. He went on to direct films in Hollywood, some of which are now classics in the "Film Noir" genre. (Our favorite of those we've seen is definitely "The Big Heat." Awesome movie! )

    Each of these cards is in really very nice condition! Spectacular!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We found a small cache of 1920's Ross Verlag postcards depicting scenes from Fritz Lang's German Expressionist film masterpiece "Die Nibelungen."

    Also, below are three Youtube links to the film. The first (as indicated) offers English subtitles and combines parts one (Siegfried) and two (Kriemhild's Revenge), but the print quality is a little poor.

    The two links below that one are for parts one and two separately, offer no English subs, but are the magnificent restoration version accomplished by the F.W. Murnau Society in 2010. For this restoration, a photo-chemical rather than digital process was employed, resulting in something as close to the original film-goer's experience as possible.

    If you're not a German speaker (or reader) this requires some dedication and focus on context, to say nothing of an almost five hour time investment! But do check it out for a few minutes at least. It's truly gorgeous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnXruo9FlQ (English Subtitles)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNa74OevW_c
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jhb2mjjx-E (photo-chemical restoration)

    Lang's "Die Nibelungen" was based on the 13th century (or earlier) epic poem, the Nibelungenlied, and is often, though it really shouldn't be, confused with Wagner's "Ring Cycle." Wagner certainly drew upon the Nibelungenlied as one of his sources, but the stories really aren't the same. The film's script was written by Thea von Harbou, a screen writer, novelist and actress.

    Thea von Harbou and Lang were a married couple incidentally, and were also the writer and director of the German Expressionist classic "Metropolis" in 1927 and the chilling "M" in '31.

    Fritz Lang was one of many in the German film industry who left Germany after the Nazis came to power. He went on to direct films in Hollywood, some of which are now classics in the "Film Noir" genre. (Our favorite of those we've seen is definitely "The Big Heat." Awesome movie! )

    Each of these cards is in really very nice condition! Spectacular!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    The Ogden Standard-Examiner, in 1927, recounted one of Fern Andra's many escapades in Germany during the First World War, at which time, accused of espionage, she was housed in a prisoner of war camp, and only weeks away from execution by firing squad, when Kaiser Wilhelm (apparently a fan) interceded on her behalf. All true? Perhaps. Who can say at this point? The trail has grown cold.

    The Germans did, in fact, suspect her of spying, and later in her life she acknowledged that she had acted as a courier for the allies, memorizing coded secrets, and carrying that information to American agents in Copenhagen, Denmark (exciting stuff, no?).

    In 1922, American newspapers, including the New York Times, reported that "German" film actress, Fern Andra, had been killed in an aeroplane crash in Germany, the plane having been piloted by no lesser a personage than Lothar von Richthofen, the brother (and also a WWI flying ace) of the "Bloody" Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen. Lothar von Richthofen also perished in the crash. True?

    Well partially. Miss Andra was not actually a German actress, but an American one, who, called the "German Mary Pickford," was one of the biggest stars of the silent film industry in that country (and in all of Europe) between the mid 1910s and the mid 1920s. She hadn't been killed in the plane crash, however, but was the sole survivor, though very badly hurt.

    By that time, she was better known as the Baroness Fern Andra, since to avoid further accusations of spying during the war, she had married the Baron Friedrich von Weichs, a nephew of Empress Zita of Austria and also a former member of the Baron von Richthofen's fighter squadron. Though her husband was killed in the war, Miss Andra maintained the title of Baroness throughout the rest of her days, and over a few subsequent marriages.

    Born in 1893 Illinois, the stepdaughter of a high wire performer and a mother she claimed was an opera singer, but who after recent research is thought to have been a backstage costume dresser and seamstress, she was named Vernal Edna Andrews, and it was likely under that plain old American name that she was performing in circus and vaudeville acts as a child (apparently she performed up on the high wire at the tender age of four).

    Fern Andra's adventures don't stop there. A remarkable life! She was a film actress in more than 80 motion pictures, a dancer, a circus and vaudeville performer, a screenwriter, a director, a producer, an aviatrix, yes, perhaps a spy. And she not only fell under suspicion of espionage in Germany on behalf of the allies in WWI, but twenty years later, because of her long residence in Germany, and her association (no one says just how personal) with a young scriptwriter named Joseph Goebbels (many, many years before he became one of the most important figures of Hitler's Third Reich), she also fell under suspicion of spying on behalf of the Nazis! Her story goes on and on... but we can't.

    Google this gal! and definitely follow this link to Youtube, where you can see her in the wonderful German Expessionist horror film "Genuine," by the director of the classic "The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari," Robert Weine. Miss Andra performed in the title role, and wore it well.
    She doesn't wear much else, actually. The film caused quite a furor, because her costume was mostly painted on! Make popcorn and settle in. Great fun :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4dwATAiq4c

    This is a "Film Sterne" card ("sterne" means "star" in German), published in about 1917, by Heinrich Ross, probably the most important figure behind the film star postcard industry between the 1910s and 1930s. The film, "Des Lebens Ungemischte Freude," or "The Life of Unmixed Joy," was likely produced in 1917. Very little information is available about this film. From this image, and others we have seen from this film, it is clear that Miss Andra played the part of a circus performer.

    Though the title directly implies a life of joy minus any troubles, clearly this is is a false front. If they made such a film, where would be the conflict? What would be Miss Andra's "motivation?" :) No, in fact, the title was almost certainly taken from a line in "Der Ring des Polykrates," a late 18th century lyrical ballad written by Friedrich Schiller, inspired by the ancient Greek Histories of Herodotus. So, the title of our film, in this context, probably speaks to the idea that great success in life invites tragedy.

    We hope you love this wonderful card as much as we do! In about as near to perfect condition as you can find, we'll list this one in our "Under the Big Top" section, since Miss Andra's roots were in the circus, and in this film she played a circus performer.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    As far as we can tell, Miss Olive Haygate was an English actress whose home, in the late 1890s, was London. Nevertheless, we don't run across images of her by British photographers, so perhaps she went to France before becoming famous. We should mention that during this time, it was not unheard of for British theatrical producers to own French theaters and music halls, and also to stock those theaters with British acts.

    As to how well known she was in late 1890s London, we did come across a very interesting bit of history concerning her in 1897, at the Adelphi Theater. At this time, Miss Haygate was an under-study for a Miss Millward, which does suggest it was early in her career.

    As the story goes, Miss Haygate met with a Frederic Lane (also an understudy, to then well known actor William Terriss), before rehearsal for a production. Lane told her, in a joking way, that he was certain to take over Terriss' role, as he had dreamt the night before of Terriss lying prostrate on a stair landing in the theater, with a group of actors and others surrounding him as if he was in a terrible state. Miss Haygate laughed with Lane at the silly superstitiousness of the idea, as did others to whom Lane recounted his dream, but as it turned out, the actor Terriss was stabbed to death that very night, and on that very stair landing! The murderer was another actor, named Archer (not Miles...that's another mystery story :), who apparently bore Terriss a long standing grudge, and was later judged to have been insane at the time the crime was committed.

    However reliable, or otherwise, this account may be, we got it from a Google abstract of volume 14 of proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research. Included are letters of testimony from Miss Haygate and others. Below is the link to the abstract, if you'd like to read Haygate's letter in detail:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=X1HYAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA310&lpg=PA310&dq=olive+haygate&source=bl&ots=MmdAjuEfv-&sig=vFIdNzQ9Khic_CE5mf3ICnhfYPs&hl=en&sa=X&ei=mo0fU4OKDO_iyAGh44CgDQ&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=olive%20haygate&f=false

    Great image of the lovely Miss Haygate in very nice, unposted condition. Upper left corner a little rounded.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    This mini-collection has as its centerpiece a card featuring the American dancer who contributed so much to la Belle Epoque and to modern dance, Mlle. Loie Fuller!

    Félix Potin (1820-1871) was a 19th century French entrepreneur who opened a factory (later factories), producing and packaging goods under his name brand, and selling them in his shops. He opened his first store in 1844, and his company eventually expanded into a chain of over a thousand stores. Wikipedia, from whom we got the bulk of our info for this listing, suggests that the old Woolworth's five and dime chain based their business model on Potin's.

    Our fifth listing image (Not for sale, as it is not even our postcard but an image we found online) is of one of those shops.

    Monsieur Potin also offered home delivery of his products, and with some purchases gave away these handy-dandy trading cards with real photo images of famous people. Sports figures, writers, artists, and famous figures from many walks of life appeared on them. Potin's customers loved them.

    They collected them, traded them, and stored them in special Félix Potin issued card albums for safe keeping. Perhaps that is why, as tiny as these little gems are (3, by 1 and 3/4 inches, or approx 4 and 1/2, by 7 and 1/2 cm.), there are so many of them out there. That is also why most of those we come across have album residue affixed to the back sides.

    Most of these cards are relatively common, or we would not be able to offer them at these prices, but there are a few very sought after cards out there. One of them, or so we've read online, is a card featuring famous American fighter, Jack Dempsey, that is apparently valued at upwards of three hundred dollars!

    All of the trading cards in our mini collections are from the second series offered by Monsieur Potin in, we believe, 1907. They are all in quite good condition though showing some wear, and despite the album residue on the backsides, are in very sturdy condition (if anything sturdier for the residue rather than otherwise).

    We thought that since these stage artiste cards figure well into our venue here, we would offer our customers a few little "mini collections" in our artifacts section. These are real photographic prints of good detail and clarity. Really very nice items.

    *Please note that these mini collections count as a single item sale and do not, when purchased on their own, qualify for free shipping.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two paper goods items, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more paper goods items from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    This mini-collection has as its centerpiece a card featuring the American dancer who contributed so much to la Belle Epoque and to modern dance, Mlle. Loie Fuller!

    Félix Potin (1820-1871) was a 19th century French entrepreneur who opened a factory (later factories), producing and packaging goods under his name brand, and selling them in his shops. He opened his first store in 1844, and his company eventually expanded into a chain of over a thousand stores. Wikipedia, from whom we got the bulk of our info for this listing, suggests that the old Woolworth's five and dime chain based their business model on Potin's.

    Our fifth listing image (Not for sale, as it is not even our postcard but an image we found online) is of one of those shops.

    Monsieur Potin also offered home delivery of his products, and with some purchases gave away these handy-dandy trading cards with real photo images of famous people. Sports figures, writers, artists, and famous figures from many walks of life appeared on them. Potin's customers loved them.

    They collected them, traded them, and stored them in special Félix Potin issued card albums for safe keeping. Perhaps that is why, as tiny as these little gems are (3, by 1 and 3/4 inches, or approx 4 and 1/2, by 7 and 1/2 cm.), there are so many of them out there. That is also why most of those we come across have album residue affixed to the back sides.

    Most of these cards are relatively common, or we would not be able to offer them at these prices, but there are a few very sought after cards out there. One of them, or so we've read online, is a card featuring famous American fighter, Jack Dempsey, that is apparently valued at upwards of three hundred dollars!

    All of the trading cards in our mini collections are from the second series offered by Monsieur Potin in, we believe, 1907. They are all in quite good condition though showing some wear, and despite the album residue on the backsides, are in very sturdy condition (if anything sturdier for the residue rather than otherwise).

    We thought that since these stage artiste cards figure well into our venue here, we would offer our customers a few little "mini collections" in our artifacts section. These are real photographic prints of good detail and clarity. Really very nice items.

    *Please note that these mini collections count as a single item sale and do not, when purchased on their own, qualify for free shipping.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two paper goods items, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more paper goods items from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    20.00 USD

    as per convo


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    La Bella Gardenia, Breathtaking Belle Epoque Image, circa 1900
    We've found no history on this performer. What a beautiful image. Note the rubber stamped text at the bottom of the card. This indicates that the artiste was just breaking into the theater business, and this card, though so very professionally produced, was probably sent off to booking agents and theater managers, rather than being offered to the public alongside cards of already established artistes.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    9.00 USD

    Wow, but what a noisy coronation that must have been! Certainly one way of occupying idle hands, but what a cacophony :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Such lovely condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Such very nice condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    70.00 USD

    Anna Pavlova (1881-1931), prima ballerina of the Imperial Russian Ballet and Diaghilev's Ballet Russes, needs little introduction. She is possibly the most famous of all Russian dancers and perhaps best known for her performance of "The Dying Swan," a ballet solo that was choreographed for her by dancer/choreographer Michel Fokine in 1907.

    We read a review in "The Musical Courier," November, 1921, of Pavlova's performance in New York of the Dragonfly, a short ballet she choreographed for herself, to music by Fritz Kreisler. Of course the performance was received with "tumultuous applause."

    This card's image, though unattributed, may have been photographed by Hermann Mishkin of New York. We've seen other images of Pavlova as Dragonfly signed by Mishkin, who was incidentally known for the dreamy background flats he used for portraits in his studio. It was published by Ross Verlag.

    A wonderful find, though a bit rounded at the corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    How cute is this Pierrette? Love the tuft of hair popping out of her beanie :) The photographer Robert Boivin apparently got started in Paris right around 1890 and seems to have kept himself fairly busy. He was certainly no Reutlinger or Walery, but for a humble portraitist with a small studio along the Boulevard Poissonniere, one who it seems was having trouble getting the cash together to buy a new drop cloth, see what a lively response he was able to draw out of this client! I've never done any portrait photography, but surely that must be half the battle. Charming, charming RPPC.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    What a fascinating face she had. Wonderful portrait from Verlag Hermann Leiser, circa 1920s. To demonstrate the wonderful clarity of this photograph, we caught your attention with a close, close crop. Really beautiful clarity on this one :)

    Fraulein Eva was born in 1899 Berlin as Elly Giese. As a young girl, she worked in the cigarette manufacturing industry, but by age 19 was being cast in silent films. She received leading roles immediately, mainly in comedies, and playing mostly adolescent girls.

    Her career, though successful, was a relatively short one, mostly spanning the 1920s. She did make a few films into the 1930s, but whether she simply didn't catch on with the "talkies," or didn't see eye to eye with the Nazis, who gained power in the 1930s, is not a question we were able to answer through our research, though doubtless we'll learn more in future.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Mae Murray and John Gilbert from Erich von Stroheim's "The Merry Widow," 1925.

    Mae Murray (1885-1965), known as "the girl with the bee-stung lips," was a silent film star, producer and screen writer in the late 1910s, and into the 20s. In addition to her generous mouth, she was known for her elaborate costumes, over the top dramatics, and was all the rage for some time. Following her fourth marriage though, this one to David Mdivani, a white Russian refugee from an aristocratic Georgian family, she fell into trouble. She allowed him to manage her career and finances. He made some terrible choices for her, one of which resulted in her making an implacable enemy of producer Louis B. Mayer, and consequently being blacklisted in Hollywood. She never overcame this circumstance, and gradually faded into obscurity.

    Dastardly David Mdivani was one of five siblings of the Mdivani family who left Georgia as refugees, fleeing the Bolsheviks, and became known as the "marrying Mdivanis" because of their habit of marrying heirs and heiresses for their money. They seem to have been thoroughly ruthless in their predations, leaving trails of broken hearts, empty bank accounts, and misery in their wakes. Boo! Hiss!

    A great card from a great movie.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    This card was posted in Budapest, in 1918.

    If you've never run across this biblical tale, Judith was a woman from the city of Bethulia--a great hero among those women whose stories are told in the bible.

    An Assyrian general named Holofernes, in command of a great army, was bent upon the destruction of her besieged city, but Judith devised a plan. Accompanied only by a single female servant, she dressed herself in the sexiest way possible and passed through the city gates. She then managed to get herself captured by the Assyrians.

    Holofernes, finding Judith much to his liking, called her to his tent intending to have his way with her, but keeping her virtue intact, she got him drunk instead and cut off his head, with his own sword no less, thereby saving her city and bringing about the downfall of the Assyrians!
    Not only that, but she and her servant returned to Bethulia unscathed, with the head of Holofernes and told the tale to the city elders.

    We believe an artiste named Germaine Rose, whom we've encountered on other postcards, posed for this image of Judith, though sometimes, instead of being titled Judith, this same image on other cards bears the text, "La Danse du Sabre," turning the image into a contemporary orientalist image and shaking off the biblical reference.
    This illustrates the way in which canny publishers sometimes marketed the same postcard image to different audiences, a sexy dance image on the one hand, and on the other hand, an image designed to inspire patriotic fervor during dark times. (see link to our Danse du Sabre card below) Either way, a great image :)

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/159216557/la-danse-du-sabre-belle-epoque-artiste?ref=shop_home_active_23

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Published by Photochemie of Berlin circa 1906 (the year Germany began using divided back postcards) the more we look at this one, the more we love it. It is as if the young woman, by taking up her pen and writing whatever it is she writes, is giving birth to a fantasy realm that is rubbing up against the mundane to the degree that the "real" world begins to take on aspects of the fantastic! So very cool :) Posted in Berlin in 1907.

    Though it hardly fits, we'll list this under "risque" because it is technically one of those boudoir/lingerie images that were considered risque at the time.
    Lovely posted condition with writing on the back in a beautiful hand that serves to boost the atmosphere! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Lebender Marmor, or Living Marble. One of a very popular postcard series in which the models, often in classical costume (or, as in this case, almost entirely out of costume :), were posed and made up to resemble marble statues. This one is a real beauty with lovely silvering of the image that adds to the antiquated aura of the image!

    See another card from the same series:

    https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/redpoulaine/tools/listings/stats:true/268159810

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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