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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Great dance image, Weimar era. No history on the dancer and no photographer attribution, but we sure love this one :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Fräulein Übermut, this card's title, translates into English as "Cheeky Girl," or "Bold Young Lady." Our very cute model is attired as a school-age girl, that perennial costume of innocence, and yet she lounges on...horrors...a bearskin rug, the vintage postcard code for sensual abandon! A bit racy? Yes, but realistically, at the time this postcard was produced it's safe to say that almost every young female star of silent film wore the schoolgirl uniform in any number of popular roles. They discovered hidden treasures, uncovered spy rings and foiled kidnappers while capturing the hearts of their romantic male leads. The costume signaled innocence and purity, yes, but usually the characters were not so young that a kiss or caress was inappropriate, so let her flirt a little :)

    This card was printed by Rotophot of Berlin. Note the logo on the lower left. See the horse? The word for horse in German is "Ross" and the guy in charge of Rotophot in the early 1910s was none other than Heinrich Ross, who in the late 1910s would create Ross Verlag, the company responsible for probably more "film star" postcards during the 1910s thru '30s than any other. He was hugely successful into the early '30s before Hitler came into power. Heinrich Ross escaped the Nazis with his life, barely, but not with his fortune. In the 1940s he was employed in a machine shop in Chicago illinois. He passed away in Chicago, in 1957, at the age of 86. His death certificate listed his occupation as printer. (Thanks to rosspostcards.com. for some of our listing's history. A great site!!!)

    A lovely, funny card, in wonderful unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Fräulein Übermut, this card's title, translates into English as "Cheeky Girl," or "Bold Young Lady." Our very cute model is attired as a school-age girl, that perennial costume of innocence, and yet she lounges on...horrors...a bearskin rug, the vintage postcard code for sensual abandon! A bit racy? Yes, but realistically, at the time this postcard was produced it's safe to say that almost every young female star of silent film wore the schoolgirl uniform in any number of popular roles. They discovered hidden treasures, uncovered spy rings and foiled kidnappers while capturing the hearts of their romantic male leads. The costume signaled innocence and purity, yes, but usually the characters were not so young that a kiss or caress was inappropriate, so let her flirt a little :)

    This card was printed by Rotophot of Berlin. Note the logo on the lower left. See the horse? The word for horse in German is "Ross" and the guy in charge of Rotophot in the early 1910s was none other than Heinrich Ross, who in the late 1910s would create Ross Verlag, the company responsible for probably more "film star" postcards during the 1910s thru '30s than any other. He was hugely successful into the early '30s before Hitler came into power. Heinrich Ross escaped the Nazis with his life, barely, but not with his fortune. In the 1940s he was employed in a machine shop in Chicago illinois. He passed away in Chicago, in 1957, at the age of 86. His death certificate listed his occupation as printer. (Thanks to rosspostcards.com. for some of our listing's history. A great site!!!)

    A lovely, funny card, in wonderful unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    So charming :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    We do specialize in fantasy, here at Red Poulaine. It's true! Theatrical fantasy, even, and sometimes, perhaps, a little phantasy too, though seldom. Every now and then, though, we need to ground ourselves a bit with a few RPPCs (Real Photo Post Cards), in order to get a glimpse of what life offstage was like.

    After all, if you ever find the absolutely right pair of silver slippers, and tapping them together three times, saying, "There's no place like Belle Epoque Paris, there's no place like Belle Epoque Paris, there's no..." and Poof! you arrive there, you had better have an idea of what it was like, non? Here's an RPPC from France, picturing real people, who worked, or patronized businesses in those bygone times.

    Great image of a working class hotel/restaurant in Belle Epoque France. Advertised in the window are wines, daily special menu, and rooms to let. Probably relatively simple fare. Wonderful dog :) These old RPPCs were often loved half to death. pinholes in two of the corners, and general wear. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    39.00 USD

    Literally a "pin-up" of Méaty Fleuron, please note there are four tiny pin holes in this card, one each in the upper right and left corners, and two in the bottom center, within the blank space reserved for messages beneath the image.

    We know that Méaty Fleuron was performing at Aix-les-Bains in 1893 and practically nothing more than that at this point. She was the sister of Lise Fleuron, the better known of the two.

    We've never had a nude portrait of either Lise, or Méaty, Fleuron before, never even seen one! This is almost certainly quite a rare card and will be a valuable addition to any collection of Belle Epoque postcards.

    Clearly, this image celebrates a body shape that was more popular at the turn of the century than since and raises a number of questions, but we don't really have the space in this venue for a discussion as involved as that would be.

    Most images of Méaty Fleuron we find, like those of her sister Lise, are a tad on the suggestive side. Often she wears the skin-tight body suits popular in that era. Monsieur Oricelly of Paris was also the photographer of most of the other images of her we've seen.

    It's likely that Méaty, like her sister, was born in the 1870s in Alsace-Lorraine. Lise Fleuron was actually born Marguerite Rauscher, Rauscher, therefore, was probably Méaty's name also. If that reads very German to you, it's because the region of Alsace-Lorraine, a border-land, was for a very long time under the control of France, and then Germany, and then back again, and so on.
    However, when Prussia annexed Alsace-Lorraine in the early 1870s, Herr, or Monsieur, Rauscher, declared French, rather than German, nationality.

    The name Fleuron suggests a flower-shaped jewel and it may or may not be coincidental that in 1884, the French author Georges Ohnet, a popular novelist of the period whose name, at the time, was as well known as that of his contemporary, Emile Zola, published a work of fiction titled "Lise Fleuron." This novel spun the tale of a young girl...her fall from innocence...her gradual climb to success in the theaters of Paris...romance, scandal, and according to at least one British reviewer, a lack of morality, which might be why it quickly sold through more than 100 editions! When attempting to research the Fleuron sisters, we run across page after page of references to this novel.

    Would it be so surprising to learn that a young actress adopted the name of a very famous fictional siren of the stage and that her sister Méaty followed suit? Maybe not so much :) She would have enjoyed immediate "brand recognition," at the very least.

    The two sisters were very popular stage performers (and postcard queens) of the late 1800s and very early 1900s. Their time was generally a good decade before most of the stage artistes featured on our cards, and by the beginning of WWI (1914), the end of that beautiful era (la Belle Epoque), their popularity seems to have waned.

    A remarkable find in nice unposted condition. The apparent circular blemish near the bottom edge of the image appears to be a concentration of silvering...not sure how this might have happened, whether a flaw in production, or a drop of some substance after printing.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    When this image was taken, no more than three short years after 1900, when Henri Manuel and his brother Gaston first opened their studio in Paris, who would have guessed that among French photographers, Monsieur Manuel would soon rise to be named the official government photographer of all France! But, in 1903, or so, he was still photographing the antics of tangled twins in mermaid gowns! Ah well, c'est la vie! :)

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    This mini-collection has as its centerpiece a card featuring the American dancer who contributed so much to la Belle Epoque and to modern dance, Mlle. Loie Fuller!

    Félix Potin (1820-1871) was a 19th century French entrepreneur who opened a factory (later factories), producing and packaging goods under his name brand, and selling them in his shops. He opened his first store in 1844, and his company eventually expanded into a chain of over a thousand stores. Wikipedia, from whom we got the bulk of our info for this listing, suggests that the old Woolworth's five and dime chain based their business model on Potin's.

    Our fifth listing image (Not for sale, as it is not even our postcard but an image we found online) is of one of those shops.

    Monsieur Potin also offered home delivery of his products, and with some purchases gave away these handy-dandy trading cards with real photo images of famous people. Sports figures, writers, artists, and famous figures from many walks of life appeared on them. Potin's customers loved them.

    They collected them, traded them, and stored them in special Félix Potin issued card albums for safe keeping. Perhaps that is why, as tiny as these little gems are (3, by 1 and 3/4 inches, or approx 4 and 1/2, by 7 and 1/2 cm.), there are so many of them out there. That is also why most of those we come across have album residue affixed to the back sides.

    Most of these cards are relatively common, or we would not be able to offer them at these prices, but there are a few very sought after cards out there. One of them, or so we've read online, is a card featuring famous American fighter, Jack Dempsey, that is apparently valued at upwards of three hundred dollars!

    All of the trading cards in our mini collections are from the second series offered by Monsieur Potin in, we believe, 1907. They are all in quite good condition though showing some wear, and despite the album residue on the backsides, are in very sturdy condition (if anything sturdier for the residue rather than otherwise).

    We thought that since these stage artiste cards figure well into our venue here, we would offer our customers a few little "mini collections" in our artifacts section. These are real photographic prints of good detail and clarity. Really very nice items.

    *Please note that these mini collections count as a single item sale and do not, when purchased on their own, qualify for free shipping.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two paper goods items, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more paper goods items from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    No history we've found on the charming Miss Doré. We'll keep looking, though.
    Wonderful Art Nouveau border really makes this a striking card!

    On the reverse side of the card, note "For Inland Use Only." This text was applied to cards printed in England after 1902, and before 1904. Why? Because a man in England named Frederick Hartmann came up with the idea of the divided back postcard, which would allow senders to write messages (or even to place advertisements) on the backs of postcards where before only the recipient's address was allowed.

    This was just fine in England, but the rest of the world lagged behind just a bit, France not allowing the divided back until 1904, Germany, 1905, and the United States, 1906. So, what happened if a person in England sent a divided back card to someone in France in those early days? The French postal authorities affixed an added fee to the card, payable upon delivery!

    A very nice card, very evocative of the time and with a nice bit of postal history too :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    12.00 USD

    We have always loved this series of images by Walery of the mysteriously veiled Mlle. Fiska. Not that she was veiled in some mysterious way or that there is any mystery behind the fact that she is veiled...it is just a veil, after all...simply that being veiled, she assumes a mysterious quality...well, it's at least a very interesting image...but never mind, we were just pulling the proverbial leg. That is not to say that your leg is necessarily proverbial, or anything other than an ordinary leg... but yes, we were pulling it. Sorry :) We couldn't find any history on Mlle. Fiska, you see, and felt we needed to put something in this listing, so there we are!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    We found a small cache of 1920's Ross Verlag postcards depicting scenes from Fritz Lang's German Expressionist film masterpiece "Die Nibelungen."

    Also, below are three Youtube links to the film. The first (as indicated) offers English subtitles and combines parts one (Siegfried) and two (Kriemhild's Revenge), but the print quality is a little poor.

    The two links below that one are for parts one and two separately, offer no English subs, but are the magnificent restoration version accomplished by the F.W. Murnau Society in 2010. For this restoration, a photo-chemical rather than digital process was employed, resulting in something as close to the original film-goer's experience as possible.

    If you're not a German speaker (or reader) this requires some dedication and focus on context, to say nothing of an almost five hour time investment! But do check it out for a few minutes at least. It's truly gorgeous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TnXruo9FlQ (English Subtitles)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNa74OevW_c
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jhb2mjjx-E (photo-chemical restoration)

    Lang's "Die Nibelungen" was based on the 13th century (or earlier) epic poem, the Nibelungenlied, and is often, though it really shouldn't be, confused with Wagner's "Ring Cycle." Wagner certainly drew upon the Nibelungenlied as one of his sources, but the stories really aren't the same. The film's script was written by Thea von Harbou, a screen writer, novelist and actress.

    Thea von Harbou and Lang were a married couple incidentally, and were also the writer and director of the German Expressionist classic "Metropolis" in 1927 and the chilling "M" in '31.

    Fritz Lang was one of many in the German film industry who left Germany after the Nazis came to power. He went on to direct films in Hollywood, some of which are now classics in the "Film Noir" genre. (Our favorite of those we've seen is definitely "The Big Heat." Awesome movie! )

    Each of these cards is in really very nice condition! Spectacular!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    26.00 USD

    In the poem Der Gott und die Bayadere, Johann von Goethe (1749-1832) interpreted an Indian folktale about a god and a temple dancer.
    In the story, the god Mahadeva in his sixth incarnation, comes to earth to live as humans live in order to better understand them.
    On the last day of his life in that incarnation (while yet a beautiful young man), he meets a temple dancer on the street who invites him into her home.
    One thing leads to another and they spend a passionate night together, the temple dancer finding true love for the first time, in the arms of the god.
    To discover if she truly loves him, Mahadeva tests her by seeming to die in the bed they share as she sleeps.
    When she awakens the next morning to discover his dead body beside her, she is heart-broken.

    Later, funeral rites commence and his body is placed upon a pyre for burning. The temple dancer, suffering deeply from the loss, wishes only to join him in death, to join him on the pyre, but the priests refuse her.
    "This man was not your husband," they say. "You are a temple dancer and your duties are not the duties of a wife."
    Ignoring them, she cries out that even if it was only for one night, the young man whose body burns on the pyre was her true love, and running to the pyre, she casts herself into the flames.
    In that instant, Mahadeva rises up, whole and unharmed, lifts up the temple dancer, also miraculously untouched by the fire, and carries her away with him up to heaven.

    Some story, huh? Well, leaving all gender politics aside for the moment, because a story like this one certainly "sparks" debate, our postcard's image, from a painting by enormously gifted Austrian painter and illustrator Erich Schütz (1886-1937) is simply gorgeous! For you fans of turn of the century American illustration, doesn't Herr Schütz's work bring to mind some of our own early Brandywine school art, like Howard Pyle and Andrew Wyeth?

    From the marvelous text and border design on the card's face, we'll guess this card was produced in the 1910s.

    Incidentally, the spelling of Goethe's name at the top of the card is very unusual. Though an o with an umlaut (those two little dots up on top of the o) often takes the place of an oe in German words where those two vowels are found side by side (and in that order), important proper names from the past (definitely like Goethe's name in this case) are usually left unaltered. A case of artistic license, we suppose, and the Jugendstil, after all, was all about casting off the shackles of the past and embracing the modern :)

    If you'd care to read the poem, the link below will take you to a site where it is offered both in the original German and in English.

    http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=74030

    An amazing card with only minor wear to edges and corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    33.00 USD

    We named this one "Look Twice" because the listing image doesn't give you the whole image at first glance. Family pet? Relative who fell afoul of the fairies? We laugh every time we see this card :) The sheep looks so very, I dunno...happy...don't you think?
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    28.00 USD

    How brazen!!! Naughty flapper shows off underwear. Some wear to surface and edges, otherwise a very nice print on this vintage French postcard from the 1920s.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Lovely embossed postcard. We think the stage artiste may have been Juliette Méaly, a famous Parisian cabaret performer and a model for post-impressionist Henri Toulouse Lautrec. Probably a German postcard printed for the British market circa 1906-1910. Excellent condition.
    A lovely card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Really a lovely hand-tinted image of a fancy-dressed young woman with a fan. On the obverse is the date, 1927? And a love letter that appears to be in Latvian. How do we know this? Because when we find a message written in a language unknown to us, we beat our heads up against Google Translate with words chosen at random until either we catch a break or our heads do :) In this case, the phrase "milu tevi" did the trick. It's repeated again and again in the postcard message and means, "love you." Sometimes with exclamation points!!! Sweet :)

    A very nice postcard with minor wear to edges and corners.
    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    When speaking of romantic Belle Epoque postcard images of beautiful women, it would be a strange thing if the name "Doll" didn't come up in the conversation. She appeared in so many greatly loved images, most often, we believe, photographed by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris. The word best fitted to most of those images would probably be "Fairy Tale." Usually draped in a diaphanous gown and often crowned with wildflowers, Doll would be pictured wandering in the forest, a romantic woodland sprite, crossing a footbridge over a narrow stream, leaning into a nurturing tree, communing with squirrels, hares, deer, even peacocks.

    We've not yet come across any history on this popular model. Because we've never seen any images of her on a stage, we're going to assume that she was strictly a model, more or less, rather than a theatrical performer.

    What is unusual about this image, even rare, is the nudity. We have never seen this card before and may never again! Though definitely not a modern reprint, this particular card was printed using perhaps an offset press and is probably a pirated version of the original photo postcard by Jean Agelou (see the JA mark, bottom right), probably the best known today of all the nude photographers in France at that time.

    Jean Agelou was born in Alexandria Egypt, to French parents, in 1878. Active as a photographer in France from at least the early 1900s, it is likely that by the time this portrait was made, nude photo images were illegal (though decency leagues pressed for such legislation with varying success throughout the years, in 1908, strict laws were passed), and to produce them carried a possible prison sentence.

    So although he, and his brother George, no doubt continued "legitimate" work in the open, his nude postcards are marked with only JA , to preserve anonymity (sometimes GA, for George Agelou, though we've read in a few places that George was not, himself, the photographer, but only handled the business end of their partnership). Jean and his brother George both died as a result of an automobile accident, in 1921.

    We hope this will be much appreciated by both fans of Doll, and of Jean Agelou. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Near pristine condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Such very nice condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Such very nice condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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