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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    22.00 USD

    How cute is this Pierrette? Love the tuft of hair popping out of her beanie :) The photographer Robert Boivin apparently got started in Paris right around 1890 and seems to have kept himself fairly busy. He was certainly no Reutlinger or Walery, but for a humble portraitist with a small studio along the Boulevard Poissonniere, one who it seems was having trouble getting the cash together to buy a new drop cloth, see what a lively response he was able to draw out of this client! I've never done any portrait photography, but surely that must be half the battle. Charming, charming RPPC.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    What a fascinating face she had. Wonderful portrait from Verlag Hermann Leiser, circa 1920s. To demonstrate the wonderful clarity of this photograph, we caught your attention with a close, close crop. Really beautiful clarity on this one :)

    Fraulein Eva was born in 1899 Berlin as Elly Giese. As a young girl, she worked in the cigarette manufacturing industry, but by age 19 was being cast in silent films. She received leading roles immediately, mainly in comedies, and playing mostly adolescent girls.

    Her career, though successful, was a relatively short one, mostly spanning the 1920s. She did make a few films into the 1930s, but whether she simply didn't catch on with the "talkies," or didn't see eye to eye with the Nazis, who gained power in the 1930s, is not a question we were able to answer through our research, though doubtless we'll learn more in future.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Published by Photochemie of Berlin circa 1906 (the year Germany began using divided back postcards) the more we look at this one, the more we love it. It is as if the young woman, by taking up her pen and writing whatever it is she writes, is giving birth to a fantasy realm that is rubbing up against the mundane to the degree that the "real" world begins to take on aspects of the fantastic! So very cool :) Posted in Berlin in 1907.

    Though it hardly fits, we'll list this under "risque" because it is technically one of those boudoir/lingerie images that were considered risque at the time.
    Lovely posted condition with writing on the back in a beautiful hand that serves to boost the atmosphere! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    Lebender Marmor, or Living Marble. One of a very popular postcard series in which the models, often in classical costume (or, as in this case, almost entirely out of costume :), were posed and made up to resemble marble statues. This one is a real beauty!

    See another card from the same series:

    https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/redpoulaine/tools/listings/stats:true/268159810

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Lebender Marmor, or Living Marble. One of a very popular postcard series in which the models, often in classical costume (or, as in this case, almost entirely out of costume :), were posed and made up to resemble marble statues. This one is a real beauty with lovely silvering of the image that adds to the antiquated aura of the image!

    See another card from the same series:

    https://www.etsy.com/your/shops/redpoulaine/tools/listings/stats:true/268159810

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wonderful image of Elise De Vere by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris. Wonderful hand-tinting on this one!

    Elise De Vere (born Constance), was one of the premiere stars of her time. Born in Belgium, she was the daughter of Herbert Shakespeare Gardiner Williams (aka Charles De Vere) and Julia Ferrett, his wife. Both of them were ex-pat British stage magicians who wandered the world, performing hither and yon, when not running magic shops! Though they spent years away, she and her family maintained their "British-ness" and never gave up their citizenship. In the Paris of that time (of today, for that matter), there were numerous communities of residents from "away" who maintained close ties to their cultural origins. The Deveres, for example, regularly attended services at a local Anglican church, or so we've been told. The fact is, that a number of big French music halls were owned by English theatrical promoters during this period, some of whom regularly exported English performers to France (early "British invasion" :), just as France exported theirs to England. After all, the channel is not so wide.

    A lovely card in excellent condition!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    36.00 USD

    Beautiful example of a kind of risque Orientalism that was very popular in the early 1900s. We'll guess this postcard's image was photographed in France and that the postcard was printed in Germany, a pretty common chain of events during the early 1910s. On the card's obverse, we see in the stamp box the triangular logo for the Neue Bromsilber Convention, "NBC." NBC was an organization founded in Germany, in 1909, by producers of silver-bromide print postcards to maintain cost and quality control in what was at that time a huge industry. Finding its logo on a card therefore, helps us establish at least that the card was printed sometime after 1909. By its appearance and treatment of subject, we'll guess the 1910s for this one and probably before 1914, when the Great War broke out in Europe, and postcard publishing slowed to a crawl.

    A lovely print and in wonderful condition! Please examine our high res scans for detail. The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    We are particularly impressed by this card!! The photo image itself is lovely, of course. But the choice of decorative style made by the colorist seems really remarkable to us. The pochoir (stencil) flowers (at least it seems likely a stencil was used) are both technically impressive and naive. Their placement is evocative of primitive Fraktur paintings, or even children's crayon drawings, ignoring for the most part any folds in cloth or play of light or shadow, and so smacks you in the face as a boldly contrasting decorative afterthought while at the same time working perfectly with the whole. Also, note the way in which the ruffled bodice done in white paste is, with seeming carelessness, painted over the model's necklace. It really is wonderful, don't you think? Not having any sort of background in art, we're guessing there are applicable terms we could use to describe what the colorist achieved here, but hope you'll agree this is a beautiful card! We'll guess it was printed in Germany and because of the placement of the vertical line on the card's obverse, in about 1906.

    Very nice condition on this one. Please examine our high res scans for detail. The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    33.00 USD

    Pre 1906 German postcard. Promotional card sold to visitors. Card text reads: "Der lebende Eismensch aus dem nordlichtenchten Canada." The living Iceman of northernmost Canada. Pretty neat, huh? Who knew that up in Canada there were these magical ice people? I guess the key here is that circus and carnival goers intentionally suspended disbelief while on a quest for fun and excitement, kinda like modern folks do on the internet :) Really makes us wonder what such an act might have entailed...ice sickle swallowing? Polar bear wrestling? Great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates, will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more items. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing we are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    19.00 USD

    Absolutely wonderful RPPC of woman, garbed a la Isadora Duncan, emerging from the dark into the light. Wish we had a little context for this, a photographer or publisher, but no such luck.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Wish we'd received this in for May day! Lovely hand-coloration on this barely risque French postcard, circa 1904.

    Why 1904? Check out the text on the obverse of the card:

    "Tous les pays etrangere n'acceptent pas la correspondance au recto se renseigner a la poste,"

    which translates (more or less) as, "Not all foreign countries accept correspondence on this side of the card. Inquire at post office."

    After England first introduced the divided back postcard in late 1902, an arrangement that allowed for text messages, or even advertisements, in the section to the left of the recipient's address, other nations followed suit, but slowly. Though France began allowing divided back cards in 1904, the United States, for example, didn't allow them until 1906. So the text on our card warned the sender of this limitation. In 1904 or 1905, the text would have made good sense, and also helps us establish a tentative date of publication.

    What would have happened if in 1904 we'd sent this card from France to a friend in America? Well, it might have had an "added postage" tariff stamp slapped onto it (an added fee charged to the recipient upon delivery. Not very classy if sending a postcard to a sweetheart, for instance :), or possibly the card would simply have been tossed into the waste basket by one of those "by the numbers" postal clerks they had long ago. Thank goodness we don't have any of those nowadays (wink).

    This card is so bright and cheerful, evocative of the era, and just a little weird, don't you think? All of which makes it lots of fun :) Added bonus? Such very nice condition!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-colored vintage postcard published by NPG, the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, circa 1906. This is one of five cards in a series we recently acquired. We've read that most card series from that time ran to six cards, though we've seen some that are comprised of as many as a dozen cards. Each of the cards in the partial series, of which this is one, are numbered in the bottom left corner. One of them is numbered 9, and since we have only five of these to offer, if you're up to the challenge, you have still a little collecting to do :)

    In addition to the lovely coloration, for this edition of the series, NPG utilized their patented "Oranotype" process, one of the innumerable chemical and mechanical processes made use of by printers of photos during that era. Not really knowing what the Oranotype process was, we can at least say that although it was sometimes used for black and white prints too, their glossy surfaces seem usually to have stood the test of time very well, discouraging fading of the photo-print and and in hand-colored images, really helping those colors "pop."

    We think the photographer may have been Heinrich (Henry) Traut (1857-1940) of Munich, Germany. He was a very successful portrait and celebrity photographer who was fond of dressing his models in the "Robe Galbée" or contoured gown, commonly called the "mermaid gown" today. Of course, this costume was ubiquitous in the Jugend period, but additionally, Traut often posed his models on or near heavy and very solid-looking studio props like the bench in this image, seemingly constructed of stone, and contrasting sharply with the model's (and her costume's) softness.

    The date on the back of the card, 1904, is not the date of the card's printing. It's often mistaken for that, but rather, it's just the recorded patent date of NPG's Oranotype, or "Oranotypie" process.
    Loverly condition on this one and really, on all five of these we received in, but all of them have slightly bumped lower left corners. We'll often see, in a group of cards from the same collection, that they share in common the same little bump or crimp as a result of them having been stored, all together, in a particular way for a long period of time. But despite this tiny flaw, a really great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-colored vintage postcard published by NPG, the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, circa 1906. This is one of five cards in a series we recently acquired. We've read that most card series from that time ran to six cards, though we've seen some that are comprised of as many as a dozen cards. Each of the cards in the partial series, of which this is one, are numbered in the bottom left corner. One of them is numbered 9, and since we have only five of these to offer, if you're up to the challenge, you have still a little collecting to do :)

    In addition to the lovely coloration, for this edition of the series, NPG utilized their patented "Oranotype" process, one of the innumerable chemical and mechanical processes made use of by printers of photos during that era. Not really knowing what the Oranotype process was, we can at least say that although it was sometimes used for black and white prints too, their glossy surfaces seem usually to have stood the test of time very well, discouraging fading of the photo-print and and in hand-colored images, really helping those colors "pop."

    We think the photographer may have been Heinrich (Henry) Traut (1857-1940) of Munich, Germany. He was a very successful portrait and celebrity photographer who was fond of dressing his models in the "Robe Galbée" or contoured gown, commonly called the "mermaid gown" today. Of course, this costume was ubiquitous in the Jugend period, but additionally, Traut often posed his models on or near heavy and very solid-looking studio props like the bench in this image, seemingly constructed of stone, and contrasting sharply with the model's (and her costume's) softness.

    The date on the back of the card, 1904, is not the date of the card's printing. It's often mistaken for that, but rather, it's just the recorded patent date of NPG's Oranotype, or "Oranotypie" process.
    Loverly condition on this one and really, on all five of these we received in, but all of them have slightly bumped lower left corners. We'll often see, in a group of cards from the same collection, that they share in common the same little bump or crimp as a result of them having been stored, all together, in a particular way for a long period of time. But despite this tiny flaw, a really great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-colored vintage postcard published by NPG, the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, circa 1906. This is one of five cards in a series we recently acquired. We've read that most card series from that time ran to six cards, though we've seen some that are comprised of as many as a dozen cards. Each of the cards in the partial series, of which this is one, are numbered in the bottom left corner. One of them is numbered 9, and since we have only five of these to offer, if you're up to the challenge, you have still a little collecting to do :)

    In addition to the lovely coloration, for this edition of the series, NPG utilized their patented "Oranotype" process, one of the innumerable chemical and mechanical processes made use of by printers of photos during that era. Not really knowing what the Oranotype process was, we can at least say that although it was sometimes used for black and white prints too, their glossy surfaces seem usually to have stood the test of time very well, discouraging fading of the photo-print and and in hand-colored images, really helping those colors "pop."

    We think the photographer may have been Heinrich (Henry) Traut (1857-1940) of Munich, Germany. He was a very successful portrait and celebrity photographer who was fond of dressing his models in the "Robe Galbée" or contoured gown, commonly called the "mermaid gown" today. Of course, this costume was ubiquitous in the Jugend period, but additionally, Traut often posed his models on or near heavy and very solid-looking studio props like the bench in this image, seemingly constructed of stone, and contrasting sharply with the model's (and her costume's) softness.

    The date on the back of the card, 1904, is not the date of the card's printing. It's often mistaken for that, but rather, it's just the recorded patent date of NPG's Oranotype, or "Oranotypie" process.
    Loverly condition on this one and really, on all five of these we received in, but all of them have slightly bumped lower left corners. We'll often see, in a group of cards from the same collection, that they share in common the same little bump or crimp as a result of them having been stored, all together, in a particular way for a long period of time. But despite this tiny flaw, a really great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-colored vintage postcard published by NPG, the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, circa 1906. This is one of five cards in a partial series we recently acquired. We've read that most card series from that time ran to six cards, though we've seen some that are comprised of as many as a dozen cards. Each of the cards in the partial series, of which this is one, are numbered in the bottom left corner. One of them is numbered 9, and since we have only five of these to offer, if you're up to the challenge, you have still a little collecting to do :)

    In addition to the lovely coloration, for this edition of the series, NPG utilized their patented "Oranotype" process, one of the innumerable chemical and mechanical processes made use of by printers of photos during that era. Not really knowing what the Oranotype process was, we can at least say that although it was sometimes used for black and white prints too, their glossy surfaces seem usually to have stood the test of time very well, discouraging fading of the photo-print and and in hand-colored images, really helping those colors "pop."

    We think the photographer may have been Heinrich (Henry) Traut (1857-1940) of Munich, Germany. He was a very successful portrait and celebrity photographer who was fond of dressing his models in the "Robe Galbée" or contoured gown, commonly called the "mermaid gown" today. Of course, this costume was ubiquitous in the Jugend period, but additionally, Traut often posed his models on or near heavy and very solid-looking studio props like the bench in this image, seemingly constructed of stone, and contrasting sharply with the model's (and her costume's) softness.

    The date on the back of the card, 1904, is not the date of the card's printing. It's often mistaken for that, but rather, it's just the recorded patent date of NPG's Oranotype, or "Oranotypie" process.
    Loverly condition on this one and really, on all five of these we received in, but all of them have slightly bumped lower left corners. We'll often see, in a group of cards from the same collection, that they share in common the same little bump or crimp as a result of them having been stored, all together, in a particular way for a long period of time. But despite this tiny flaw, a really great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Gorgeously hand-colored vintage postcard published by NPG, the Neue Photographische Gesellschaft of Berlin, circa 1906. This is one of five cards in a series we recently acquired. We've read that most card series from that time ran to six cards, though we've seen some that are comprised of as many as a dozen cards. Each of the cards in the partial series, of which this is one, are numbered in the bottom left corner. One of them is numbered 9, and since we have only five of these to offer, if you're up to the challenge, you have still a little collecting to do :)

    In addition to the lovely coloration, for this edition of the series, NPG utilized their patented "Oranotype" process, one of the innumerable chemical and mechanical processes made use of by printers of photos during that era. Not really knowing what the Oranotype process was, we can at least say that although it was sometimes used for black and white prints too, their glossy surfaces seem usually to have stood the test of time very well, discouraging fading of the photo-print and and in hand-colored images, really helping those colors "pop."

    We think the photographer may have been Heinrich (Henry) Traut (1857-1940) of Munich, Germany. He was a very successful portrait and celebrity photographer who was fond of dressing his models in the "Robe Galbée" or contoured gown, commonly called the "mermaid gown" today. Of course, this costume was ubiquitous in the Jugend period, but additionally, Traut often posed his models on or near heavy and very solid-looking studio props like the bench in this image, seemingly constructed of stone, and contrasting sharply with the model's (and her costume's) softness.

    The date on the back of the card, 1904, is not the date of the card's printing. It's often mistaken for that, but rather, it's just the recorded patent date of NPG's Oranotype, or "Oranotypie" process.
    Loverly condition on this one and really, on all five of these we received in, but all of them have slightly bumped lower left corners. We'll often see, in a group of cards from the same collection, that they share in common the same little bump or crimp as a result of them having been stored, all together, in a particular way for a long period of time. But despite this tiny flaw, a really great card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Voted "Most Feared" of all teams in the 1909 Brooklyn Division,
    the Moscow Maulers strike trembling fingers of icy dread into the lily-livered opposition! Just last Saturday night, team leader "Moiderous" Marinoshka was overheard threatening the leader of another team.
    "Just you wait," she bellowed, shaking her ham fist like a mallet. "We're gonna make Minsk meat outa youse guys!"
    To which the other responded, "Why, I oughta..."

    Okay. Pure Fiction. The "sports entertainment" later known as Roller Derby didn't really come into its own before the 1940s, its popularity egged on by none other than the great Damon Runyon, but hey....it coulda happened!

    Wonderful Italian card, what appears to be a promotional RPPC of what was probably a great act. Nice unposted condition with a little rounding to the corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Lots of fun! :) A couple of young ladies on a promotional RPPC. Very professionally done, too. Lovely dresses, tresses, and over all, a lovely image!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    39.00 USD

    "Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome..."

    We recently came across a number of great vintage German musical theater postcards and thought we'd put them in what will probably be a temporary section under the heading "Cabaret," or, auf Deutch, Kabarett! Most of the cards in this section will concern theatrical entertainment in the 1920s Weimar era of post world war one Germany, though we may place a number of Austrian cards of the period and a few film star cards from that time and place into this section as well.

    Just for fun, if it's been a while since you've seen it, you might enjoy a little mood music...the very memorable opening of the classic 1972 film version of "Cabaret." Youtube link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBlB8RAJEEc

    Lya Mara, 1897-1960, was born Aleksandra Gudowicz to Polish parents. When the family moved to Warsaw at the beginning of WWI, Aleksandra studied stagecraft, soon began dancing professionally, and eventually became a hugely popular star of German silent films. She did not, however, make the transition to the talkies. Her career faded, and when Hitler came to power in '33, she and her husband, director and producer Frederic Zelnik, with whom she had enjoyed great success in earlier years, left Germany for London, where Zelnik continued to direct and produce films.
    Thanks Wikipedia for much of our biographical info!

    A great autographed card signed and dedicated by one of the biggest stars of German silent film! We've only got smatterings of German and when it comes to foreign languages in longhand, well, we're just not too polished, but we do make out the word "freundliche," so we know she wrote something friendly :)

    Ernst Schneider was one of the most important glamor photographers of the 1910s, 20s, and into the 30s, in Germany. His studio on Unter den Linden in Berlin welcomed the biggest film stars of the day, like Lya Mara as we see here and earlier, stars of the stage as well, and dancers like Anna Pavlova and Mata Hari!

    Extraordinary condition! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    29.00 USD

    "Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome..."

    We recently came across a number of great vintage German musical theater postcards and thought we'd put them in what will probably be a temporary section under the heading "Cabaret," or, auf Deutch, Kabarett! Most of the cards in this section will concern theatrical entertainment in the 1920s Weimar era of post world war one Germany, though we may place a number of Austrian cards of the period and a few film star cards from that time and place into this section as well.

    Just for fun, if it's been a while since you've seen it, you might enjoy a little mood music...the very memorable opening of the classic 1972 film version of "Cabaret." Youtube link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBlB8RAJEEc

    Berlin Cabaret dancer, Suse Elsler, was born Susanna Elsler in Bremen, Germany in 1894. Like the notorious Anita Berber and Leni Riefenstahl, Suse Elsler performed interpretive and expressionist solos not only in cabarets, but in concert halls such as the Blüthner-Saal in Berlin, during the wild Weimar era of the 1920s.

    Dancers like Fräulein Elsler followed in the footsteps of Cleo de Merode and Mata Hari, Anna Pavlova too. It could be a lonely path. These soloists were often initially viewed with suspicion by critics, and looked down upon by conservatives within their contemporary "old schools."

    "Suse Elsler received both praise and condemnation for performing
    old peasant dances rather erotically in a skimpy costume,
    portraying 'a psychosis, the girlishly floral fantasies of a
    confused generation.'

    (from Empire of
    Ecstasy, University of California Press)

    "Suse Elsler, for instance, in the Bluthnersaal. She paints herself brown, wears a rag about her middle, and ogles with her arms while drum beats resound "Temple Dance."
    When she is dressed in red and wiggles her legs besides, it is called "Anno 2000." All this doesn't hurt us spectators, at any rate; the dancer squirms now and again, as though she had struck a splinter;
    "Ecstacy."

    (from a reprinted review in the "Musical Courier" in 1921, a New York musical review magazine)

    Well, we can easily find similar pans concerning Loie Fuller's dance and Isadora Duncan's as well. Oh how we wish we could only have been there to draw our own conclusions!

    A very nice card in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


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