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Recent listings from redpoulaine

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    0 0

    19.00 USD

    "Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome..."

    We recently came across a number of great vintage German musical theater postcards and thought we'd put them in what will probably be a temporary section under the heading "Cabaret," or, auf Deutch, Kabarett! Most of the cards in this section will concern theatrical entertainment in the 1920s Weimar era of post world war one Germany, though we may place a number of Austrian cards of the period and a few film star cards from that time and place into this section as well.

    The Weimar era, particularly in Berlin, fascinates us at least in part because of its dramatic contrasts, the tinsel glitter that could not entirely disguise an ever deepening gloom, the festive mood that seemed to so many who witnessed it as if driven by misery rather than a celebration of life as had seemed the Parisian nightlife of the previous decade. In hindsight, some compared the cabaret life of Weimar Berlin to dancing at the edge of a sheer cliff, and perhaps a little of that frenzied energy clings to these images of actors and dancers.

    Just for fun, if it's been a while since you've seen it, you might enjoy a little mood music...the very memorable opening of the classic 1972 film version of "Cabaret." Youtube link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBlB8RAJEEc

    A great RPPC!!! Wonderful atmosphere and costumes. This card was trimmed a bit unevenly. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Lovely bit of early 20th century popular iconography! This is one of several beautiful religion-oriented postcards we're offering this week in which the images, though classic, make use of then contemporary style and fashion elements, in this case the model's "raccoon eyes," prevalent in early silent film. Just wonderful! Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    As a child, French born Lilianne Carré (1904-1994) was educated in convents, and studied ballet. By 14, she was a dancer in L'Opera de Paris. By 16, she was a dancer in the revue at the Casino de Paris. By 1925 she was a star in the silents, married to Hungarian Director Michael Curtiz, and by 1935, she was living in Hollywood, and married to Errol Flynn! We heartily recommend the Wikipedia article from which we lifted these snippets of her history. You don't hear a lot about her today, but Miss Damita's films pop up now and then, and there are some really stunning images of her floating around. This has got to be one of the most beautiful.
    A very nice, unposted card with a bit of rounding at the corners. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more! Practically mint. Such lovely, crisp and unposted, condition. We are always very happy when we can showcase a card like this one.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    What a magnificent headdress!
    Lovely Reutlinger mixed media image of popular music hall performer, Luz Chavita.

    Born Luisa Lacalle in 1880, in Jerez de la Frontera, Andalucia, Spain. Apparently, she moved to Paris at the tender age of 14, premiered at the La Scala theater, then on to the Folies Bergere.

    She traveled internationally and was one of the most sought after Spanish dancers of the period. Lovely pastiche of an image, typical of early Reutlinger postcards, in very nice unposted condition.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    69.00 USD

    We are really excited about this card! It is very hard to find original postcard images of Anna May Wong, and it is ridiculously hard to find beautiful full body crazy costume shots like this one! Rare and wonderful.

    Anna May Wong was born in a neighborhood that bordered the Chinatown district in Los Angeles California. She loved movies as a child, and of course with all the glitz and glamor of Hollywood just around the corner, it's no wonder that through much hard work she began film work, and then achieved recognition internationally, while still in her teens. In fact, she is considered the first Chinese American film star. She was also a fashion icon, and that comes as no surprise.

    In 1935, she was passed over for the role of O-Lan in "The Good Earth," a major film that would have been a feather in her cap. German actress Louise Rainer got the role instead. This was in the era of Hollywood wherein parts for Asian, Native American, Latino, etc., were played by white actors and actresses.

    Asian American actors, even recently, were among the least fairly represented of any group in Hollywood, one example that comes to mind is that of martial arts film star Bruce Lee, who was passed over for the lead role in the series "Kung Fu," in favor of David Carradine. Well, we grew up in the 60s and 70s, and we loved "Kung Fu," but really! David Carradine over Bruce Lee?

    In any case, Miss Wong is still loved for her romantic and exotic characters, and probably best remembered for her "dragon lady" (wikipedia) roles, one of which our card certainly represents.
    We sell, first and foremost, beautiful and fascinating images, with hopefully a bit of history attached. It is the images that got us interested, and the history that keeps us addicted to this subject, but in sharing images, we cannot always represent the performer in the way they might have most preferred. So we'll say that yes, we absolutely love Miss Wong's exotic appeal, and that yes, we certainly wish she'd had the opportunity of playing O-Lan in "The Good Earth."

    In the 1950s, she was the first Asian American to star in their own television program, "The Gallery of Madam Liu-Tsong." She passed away at the age of 56, in 1961. Thanks as always, Wikipedia!

    A marvelous card, and marvelously collectible, in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    69.00 USD

    We are really excited about this card! It is very hard to find original postcard images of Anna May Wong, and it is ridiculously hard to find beautiful full body crazy costume shots like this one! Rare and wonderful.

    Anna May Wong was born in a neighborhood that bordered the Chinatown district in Los Angeles California. She loved movies as a child, and of course with all the glitz and glamor of Hollywood just around the corner, it's no wonder that through much hard work she began film work, and then achieved recognition internationally, while still in her teens. In fact, she is considered the first Chinese American film star. She was also a fashion icon, and that comes as no surprise.

    In 1935, she was passed over for the role of O-Lan in "The Good Earth," a major film that would have been a feather in her cap. German actress Louise Rainer got the role instead. This was in the era of Hollywood wherein parts for Asian, Native American, Latino, etc., were played by white actors and actresses.

    Asian American actors, even recently, were among the least fairly represented of any group in Hollywood, one example that comes to mind is that of martial arts film star Bruce Lee, who was passed over for the lead role in the series "Kung Fu," in favor of David Carradine. Well, we grew up in the 60s and 70s, and we loved "Kung Fu," but really! David Carradine over Bruce Lee?

    In any case, Miss Wong is still loved for her romantic and exotic characters, and probably best remembered for her "dragon lady" (wikipedia) roles, one of which our card certainly represents.
    We sell, first and foremost, beautiful and fascinating images, with hopefully a bit of history attached. It is the images that got us interested, and the history that keeps us addicted to this subject, but in sharing images, we cannot always represent the performer in the way they might have most preferred. So we'll say that yes, we absolutely love Miss Wong's exotic appeal, and that yes, we certainly wish she'd had the opportunity of playing O-Lan in "The Good Earth."

    In the 1950s, she was the first Asian American to star in their own television program, "The Gallery of Madam Liu-Tsong." She passed away at the age of 56, in 1961. Thanks as always, Wikipedia!

    A marvelous card, and marvelously collectible, in very nice condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!

    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Walery of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie). Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as quaint and naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!
    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie). Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as quaint and naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!
    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie) circa 1900-1904. Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Great image! Cute costume :) Beautifully written Happy Easter message on the card's face. Minor wear to edges and corners.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Do you love this? I have to say we do. This image was published in the city of Breslau, in what was soon to be the Weimar Republic of Germany at the time, though today it is a city in Poland. Breslau was the sixth largest city in the Germany of the mid 1910s. That's about the best we can do, I'm afraid. "Bender" was some kind of a theatrical review. It looks like an awful lot of fun. The title, "Es Tut Sich Was" translates pretty much as, "It's what's happening!" with almost the contextual feeling of what in the sixties was called a "happening." And that's groovy, Baby!
    Okay, sorry, but put us in a room with a cute couple all dressed up in cat suits, and we get silly. I don't know why, we just do. That's love, I guess. Wonderful image. Very nice card.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Do you love this? I have to say we do. This image was published in the city of Breslau, in what was soon to be the Weimar Republic of Germany at the time, though today it is a city in Poland. Breslau was the sixth largest city in the Germany of the mid 1910s. That's about the best we can do, I'm afraid. "Bender" was some kind of a theatrical review. It looks like an awful lot of fun. The title, "Es Tut Sich Was" translates pretty much as, "It's what's happening!" with almost the contextual feeling of what in the sixties was called a "happening." And that's groovy, Baby!
    Okay, sorry, but put us in a room with a cute trio all dressed up in cat suits, and we get silly. I don't know why, we just do. That's love, I guess. Wonderful image. Very nice card.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Such a charming image! Sisters, possibly, or two close friends. No beaded bandeaus, sultry eyes, or long strands of beads for these two young women, who in 1921, were not yet rushing to join that throng of junior "jazz baby" flappers. This was probably a relief to their parents :) Instead, by their classical attire, they appear to have been following that celestial path opened by Isadora Duncan, or possibly Loie Fuller, whose "Fullerettes" were often photographed similarly garbed for gently choreographed cavorting about in beautifully imagined Elysian fields.

    The photographer, Krueger Art Studio, was located in Cleveland Ohio. We searched a high school yearbook from 1921 on the (very) off chance we could research these two, but to no avail.

    We also artificially darkened our fifth listing scan so you could more easily make out the girls' names, Mildred and Dorothy, and the year, 1921, written on the back of the photo. *Please note the remnants of album paper and glue at the four corners.*

    You might have noticed a light horizontal line in our second scan, near the top edge of the photograph. This is actually the light reflecting off an impressed edge that borders the photograph and the light reflection doesn't exist in a face to face examination. The impressed border is a bit odd, and hard to make out in our scans, but is similar to a press impression on an etching. We really can't say if the studio did this intentionally, or if perhaps years in a tight frame did. The album remnants argue against the framing idea, though.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The photograph measures 6 and 1/2 by 4 and 1/2 inches. Though many of our customers have framed some of their postcards to great affect, it's amazing how much more "frameable" that extra inch in length and width make a photo. We'll ship this at the same cost, in the same secure photo mailer, and under the same terms as we ship our postcards.

    Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    So many ruffles!!! Lovely photograph by Georg Gerlach of Berlin. Very nice condition on this gorgeous card.

    Australian born Clarissa Campbell was a tremendously popular dancer in the 1890s and well into the 1910s.

    For a very detailed and fascinating bio, follow the below link:

    http://www.hat-archive.com/Saharet.htm

    We love Saharet. She is certainly one of the most interesting looking dancers of the era we think, and her history is such a lively one!

    There are many, many, postcard images to be found of this lovely performer, as well as music hall posters, silent film posters, gorgeous paintings, and even an extant clip from a short film in which she dances the bolero! That film was directed in 1905 by a woman named Alice Guy, who may have been, according to the good people at IMDB, the first woman film director! You can easily access this clip from one of our blog posts. Link below:

    http://redpoulaine.blogspot.com/2012/09/saharet-india-rubber-lady.html

    We are always on the lookout for nice images of Saharet. Her high kicks out from under countless layers of ruffled skirt and her dark curls drawn up in her trademark chignon, framing her bright and vivacious features, make her images some of the most enjoyable we run across. Yes, we are definitely huge fans :)

    A very nice card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    22.00 USD

    Lise Fleuron was born Marguerite Rauscher on December 1st, 1874. Her father was an Alsatian who, following the Prussian annexation of the Alsace-Lorraine region in the early 1870s, chose French nationality, hence her very "German" name, Rauscher.

    She was a popular cafe-concert/music hall performer in the late 1890s and into the 1900s. Her sister Meaty, or sometimes Miati, was likewise the toast of Paris for some time. Both sisters were particularly well known for their plunging necklines, apparently were the constant targets of gossip, which of course only bolstered their careers :)

    So, from Rauscher to Fleuron (meaning "jewel," and why? Perhaps Monsieur Georges Ohnet, a popular nevelist in the 1880s, may have had something to do with it. In 1884 he wrote a novel titled, "Lise Fleuron," the tale of a young girl...her fall from innocence...her gradual climb to success in the theaters of Paris...romance, scandal, and according to at least one British reviewer, an utter lack of morality (which might be why it quickly sold through more than 100 editions!). When attempting to research Mlle. Fleuron and her sister Meaty, we run across page after page of references to this novel.
    Would it be so surprising to learn that a young actress adopted the name of a very famous fictional siren of the stage? Maybe not so much :) She would have enjoyed immediate "brand recognition," at the very least.

    Mlle. Fleuron passed away in Enghien, on the 27th of February, 1960.

    A really wonderful portrait of this important Belle Epoque performer by Professor Stebbing of Paris, published by Rotophot of Berlin, and posted in Germany.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    12.00 USD

    Charming photograph! The poses they took really capture a sense of movement. See their audience of two in the window above? :) This photograph just barely misses being the size of a standard postcard out of that period. It's just a touch shorter in length, and a touch wider in the other direction. We'll guess this was taken in the 1930s.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    17.00 USD

    Welcome to "Idols of the 1920s," where we hope to provide a special, cozy place for those of you who long to linger among the stars of the early silver screen, the hoofers and songbirds of dear old vaudeville's fading hours, a few divas of the grand opera, and of the operetta too, flappers, flappers, more flappers, and of course, and perhaps especially, those femmes fatales who with one smoldering glance can melt a heart, or break it in two. Have fun!

    Lydia Johnson in a wonderful shimmery, floral, costume. Lydia, (1896-1969) was actually a Russian actress, born Lydia Abramovic, in Rostov. She appeared in silent films in Russia prior to the revolution, but the politics of the new government did not agree with her, so she left the country, eventually settling in Italy. There, she worked mainly on the stage, but continued to appear in films well into the 1950s. She took the name Lydia Johnson as a stage name (Albert Johnson was the name of a dancer she married while still an actress in Russia).
    A very nice, unposted card of one of our favorite faces. Photo by Bododi, published by A. Traldi, of Milan. We always love finding one of A. Traldi's cards. Not only are the images often a delight, but the Art Nouveau/Deco logo design on their card backs are such a treat :)
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more..

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Gently hand-tinted portrait (one of our favorites of this artiste) by Leopold Reutlinger.
    Emilienne D'Alencon was a very popular Parisian dancer of la Belle Epoque and also one of "Les Grandes Trois" The Three Great Ones, also affectionately referred to by the people of France at that time as Les Grandes Horizontales, The Grand Horizontals! :) These titles referred to La Belle Otero, Liane de Pougy, and Emilienne D'Alencon, the three most prominent French performers who not only rose to great fame as stage performers at that time, but who also accumulated immense wealth as the mistresses to scions of Industry and members of European royalty. All three rose from very humble backgrounds to rub elbows with the elite of French society, and that feat made them heroes to the people of France who no doubt viewed their brash success as proof of the egalitarian nature of French society, and as expressing the essential nature of "joie de vivre!"
    A truly lovely, unposted card from the very early 1900s.

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of sudden increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    24.00 USD

    Dated 1929 on the obverse, this wonderful unidentified RPPC appears to be of Pola Negri in a fantastic lamé brocade gown, with pearls and a feathered fan as accessories. We know that in 1929 Miss Negri's fortunes failed her. A pet project, "The Woman He Scorned," was a box office flop. The stock market crash of 1929 wiped out most of her personal fortune and according to Sergio Delgado's "Pola Negri: Temptress of Silent Hollywood," she'd put on some unwanted pounds and planned to visit the spas of Baden Baden to take them off, so the location and time appear to fit the history. Also note the careful retouching of this image along her right side (our left), trimming off an inch or so from her figure.

    The card was printed on a "K Ltd." RPPC blank, the UK Kodak paper (Eastman Kodak enjoyed the lion's share of the photo-print paper market at that time and was used extensively, if not exclusively, in Europe as well as in the UK).
    A gorgeous card!
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Beautifully hand-tinted vintage postcard. Magical!
    Very nice unposted condition. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


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