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Recent listings from redpoulaine
    0 0

    18.00 USD

    "Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome..."

    We recently came across a number of great vintage German musical theater postcards and thought we'd put them in what will probably be a temporary section under the heading "Cabaret," or, auf Deutch, Kabarett! Most of the cards in this section will concern theatrical entertainment in the 1920s Weimar era of post world war one Germany, though we may place a number of Austrian cards of the period and a few film star cards from that time and place into this section as well.

    The Weimar era, particularly in Berlin, fascinates us at least in part because of its dramatic contrasts, the tinsel glitter that could not entirely disguise an ever deepening gloom, the festive mood that seemed to so many who witnessed it as if driven by misery rather than a celebration of life as had seemed the Parisian nightlife of the previous decade. In hindsight, some compared the cabaret life of Weimar Berlin to dancing at the edge of a sheer cliff, and perhaps a little of that frenzied energy clings to these images of actors and dancers.

    Just for fun, if it's been a while since you've seen it, you might enjoy a little mood music...the very memorable opening of the classic 1972 film version of "Cabaret." Youtube link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBlB8RAJEEc

    We have not found so much as a whisper regarding the life or career of Jnge (Inge) Rosen. Of course, we'll keep looking.
    Wonderful portrait by the very gifted celebrity photographer Alex Binder (1888-1929). So many of his portraits make use of the subject's shadow cast on the wall behind them. It's often very effective, and we've thought about building a collection of his images based around that feature :)
    Because most of Binder's work we've encountered were portraits of film personalities (though his work was certainly not limited to that), we wonder if Fräulein Rosen was a film actress.
    A very nice unposted card. Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    Lots of fun! :) A couple of young ladies on a promotional RPPC. Very professionally done, too. Lovely dresses, tresses, and over all, a lovely image!

    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for first class shipping in a secure photo mailer, and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, the price is the same as for a single card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, due to the costs of international shipping will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    18.00 USD

    "Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome..."

    We recently came across a number of great vintage German musical theater postcards and thought we'd put them in what will probably be a temporary section under the heading "Cabaret," or, auf Deutch, Kabarett! Most of the cards in this section will concern theatrical entertainment in the 1920s Weimar era of post world war one Germany, though we may place a number of Austrian cards of the period and a few film star cards from that time and place into this section as well.

    The Weimar era, particularly in Berlin, fascinates us at least in part because of its dramatic contrasts, the tinsel glitter that could not entirely disguise an ever deepening gloom, the festive mood that seemed to so many who witnessed it as if driven by misery rather than a celebration of life as had seemed the Parisian nightlife of the previous decade. In hindsight, some compared the cabaret life of Weimar Berlin to dancing at the edge of a sheer cliff, and perhaps a little of that frenzied energy clings to these images of actors and dancers.

    Just for fun, if it's been a while since you've seen it, you might enjoy a little mood music...the very memorable opening of the classic 1972 film version of "Cabaret." Youtube link below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBlB8RAJEEc

    Cabaret performer Gerda Siems in a cute, cute, costume and pose. Photo by Berlin theatrical portraitist Rudolf Kuzelowsky, circa 1920s. A very nice card but with moderately rounded corners and a bit of foxing on the obverse. Please see our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    11.00 USD

    Beautifully hand-tinted card depicting a woman in a charming gown having a drink and a smoke. We love the carefully decorative application of white paste on the card too!

    Contrary to popular belief, women weren't usually restricted by law from smoking, even in public, in the early 20th century. In a rare instance, in 1908, a municipal law was passed in New York city that restricted smoking by women in public places...this lasted a few weeks before it was repealed.

    On the other hand, it was definitely an unpopular habit, and women seen smoking tended to be looked down upon. Still, politically, smoking and drinking were seen by many women as expressive of a much sought after status of equality between genders and images like this one were viewed as "thoroughly modern" and were popular with supporters of suffrage.

    By the 1920s, cigarette companies were doing their best to encourage women in taking up smoking. It was made to look stylish and sexy. On an ironic note, Marlboros, the cigarette that oldsters like us, who remember the TV ads, associate with the "Marlboro Man," a very "male" rugged cowboy-type, were originally (in the mid-1920s) marketed to women as being "Mild as May" and sporting ivory colored tips for that feminine look (thanks Wikipedia!).

    One of six lovely vintage postcards in a series that beautifully captures a bit of the 1910s.
    Nice unposted condition, but with a tiny crimp in the upper-left corner (all six of the cards we acquired from this series have the same little crimp, probably occurring during decades of long term storage).
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for insurance or shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.

    And please come visit our blog at:

    redpoulaine.blogspot.com

    where we post biographical and historical tidbits, images of cards and photographs for sale, some already sold but remembered fondly, related images of historical interest and sometimes even images of items that have not yet arrived in the shop, but that are expected to arrive soon, as well as coupon codes, links to other related sites, and more!


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!

    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Walery of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie). Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    16.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as quaint and naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!
    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie). Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    Nue en collant is a French phrase meaning nude, in (what was essentially) a body stocking. These cards can't exactly be called nudes, since all the "naughty bits" are covered up, but as quaint and naive as some of them may seem at first glance, they really are historically important!
    Though postcards of this type were certainly passed around and mooned over by Oncle Jacques and his cronies down at the tobacconist's, they were also oohed and aahed over by Mama and her friends in the parlor. The models for these images, some of them very well known celebrities, were modeling something considered a weapon in the war of gender equality by many women of the day.
    What we think of as the "union suit" today, the long underwear we often see worn by unshaven prospectors and cowpokes in popular westerns, was originally invented with women in mind and was applauded by the Suffragettes. It came to be called the "union" suit (and often the "liberty" suit), because during our civil war, the union side fought, in part, for the abolition of slavery. So, what's the connection? This outfit offered escape from the "slavery" of the corset! Freedom from the constraints of a fashion industry catering to the tastes of men and not to the comfort of women. What's more, though these images certainly "objectified," this was viewed as a welcome objectification, since these were women whose forms were neither exaggerated by bustles, hidden beneath petticoats, nor squeezed into narrower shapes by tight lacings. These were images seen as very liberating, at the time.

    Nue en Collant by Leopold Reutlinger of Paris, published by SIP (Société Industrielle de Photographie) circa 1900-1904. Very nice unposted condition.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    The item you are considering for purchase is, unless otherwise noted, a vintage postcard of approximately 5 and 1/2, by 3 and 1/2 inches. Postage is for fully-insured, first class shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will not charge for postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    From the wonderful series of French postcards, "Croissants de Lune," or "Crescent Moons," this is an oh so charming image of two of our favorite people, Pierrot and Colombine, combining their magical presence with the classic paper moon motif. At last Pierrot and Colombine have a moment to themselves, without that rascal Harlequin butting in :)
    It's been our pleasure to offer cards from this series several times over the years and despite our love for the gorgeously tinted, 1920s era, Pierrot cards we often feature, this series probably remains the most magical and evocative for us.

    By its undivided back (an early postcard format feature that went by the wayside in 1904 in France), we can place this card as having been printed circa 1900-1904. Superb print, very nice condition, with minor tanning commensurate with its age of over 110 years.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    From the wonderful series of French postcards, "Croissants de Lune," or "Crescent Moons," this is an oh so charming image of two of our favorite people, Pierrot and Colombine, combining their magical presence with the classic paper moon motif. At last Pierrot and Colombine have a moment to themselves, without that rascal Harlequin butting in :)
    It's been our pleasure to offer cards from this series several times over the years and despite our love for the gorgeously tinted, 1920s era, Pierrot cards we often feature, this series probably remains the most magical and evocative for us.

    By its undivided back (an early postcard format feature that went by the wayside in 1904 in France), we can place this card as having been printed circa 1900-1904. Superb print, very nice condition, with minor tanning commensurate with its age of over 110 years.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.


    0 0

    14.00 USD

    From the wonderful series of French postcards, "Croissants de Lune," or "Crescent Moons," this is an oh so charming image of two of our favorite people, Pierrot and Colombine, combining their magical presence with the classic paper moon motif. At last Pierrot and Colombine have a moment to themselves, without that rascal Harlequin butting in :)
    It's been our pleasure to offer cards from this series several times over the years and despite our love for the gorgeously tinted, 1920s era, Pierrot cards we often feature, this series probably remains the most magical and evocative for us.

    By its undivided back (an early postcard format feature that went by the wayside in 1904 in France), we can place this card as having been printed circa 1900-1904. Superb print, very nice condition, with minor tanning commensurate with its age of over 110 years.
    Please examine our high res scans for detail.

    Postage is for fully insured, first class, shipping in a secure photo mailer (to avoid any damage to your purchase in the mails), and we happily combine shipping on all paper goods. If you purchase two cards, we will refund the postage on the second card, and when you purchase three or more cards from us at the same time, your shipping will be entirely free, except for international orders which, because of increases in international shipping rates will still be charged one card's shipping fees on orders of three or more. We do not charge for shipping materials, and as of the date of this listing are still charging below our overall cost on shipping.